descriptive essay about a nursing home

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Descriptive essay about a nursing home medical health research paper topics

Descriptive essay about a nursing home

This feeling I have right now, that if I ever needed it, I could live here, not as a pretend patient, but as a family member. Who'd be my family? Everyone in here, staff, residents, all of them Male medical student, It is important to note that regardless of age, certain aspects of life, such as the basic drives e. In Sexuality and Long-Term Care , Gayle Appel Doll provides a breadth and depth of information to augment learning about older adult sexuality and sexuality as a life-long theme.

First, it is important to be clear that this book focuses on sexuality for older adult residents in LTC settings; as such it addresses the many inherent barriers in these environments such as personal views and opinions, organizational mores and policies, social stigmas and messages, and political issues regarding resident sexuality.

Second, sexuality is defined quite broadly, including feelings about oneself, body image, the need for intimacy, touch and connection, and the traditional definition of sex is expanded to include any mutually voluntary activity with another person that involves sexual contact, whether or not intercourse or orgasm occurs Lindau et al. The author intends this book to be used to guide discussions about beliefs and stereotypes related to nursing home resident sexuality, provide ideas for staff sensitivity training, and encourage organizations to develop policies regarding resident sexuality p.

Of utmost importance is that readers will view each resident as a whole person. This book is user-friendly and well-written, offering direct content on the topic of older adult sexuality, clearly stated definitions, useful figures, tables, and key points identified in the text with a picture of a key and presented in a separate text box.

Each chapter ends with an activity that can be done individually or in groups, providing an opportunity for experiential learning and information integration. This is a comprehensive book on older adult long-term resident sexuality and a tremendous resource for long-term settings, family members, and health professions staff and students who work with older adults. Not surprisingly, only three of the Learning by Living students wrote about sexuality in the nursing home.

These quotes were from male students living in veterans nursing homes. Did you know that:. Hugs are so much easier to give if both people are standing. If one person is in a wheelchair, they tend to run over the standing hugger's feet. If both are in wheelchairs, it's difficult for both to lean over enough to wrap your arms around each other Female medical student, Whatever possessions and place in society that they [the residents] used to have are all gone. Very few relationships that they've made still remain.

All they have left is themselves and maybe they can't even be themselves because of the lack of privacy and personal space. And as for schedules, they don't even get the option of making that for themselves. Before his nursing home stay ended, he met a resident couple who began their relationship in the home.

He not only talked with them about their desire for privacy but assisted in getting them to talk with staff about accessing the conjugal room. Another student wrote:. What about sexuality? I know I am in my sexual prime, but how do these guys do it? Tonight my roommate called his lady friend and talked to her for almost an hour. Doug's wife comes in and visits often. I know sexuality isn't all about having sex…it's about other things as well.

How do these men satisfy those urges? Or better yet that passion in their lives? It can't just go away. I just wonder if the feeling arises, how do these guys deal with it for months on end of being in these places where their privacy is neverprivate? No one really has talked about it. I also wonder how they fill the void of passion and that sexuality of needing a hug or embrace.

I guess it gets filled with other things that make you happy like family, or grandchildren. I don't know I am not there yet Male medical student, One male student encountered a gay veteran resident. There is no question that sexuality, intimacy, and emotional nurturing between loved ones in a nursing home environment are constrained.

Even in those homes that are progressive, there is still the risk that some staff may feel uneasy about resident sexual needs in the broadest sense of the term. This book should be required reading for nursing home administrators and staff, and periodic training programs on resident sexuality would be beneficial at each nursing home. An important component of preparing those who will provide care for older adults is the provision of opportunities, structural and contextual, for gaining a better understanding of aging through closer and extended contact with older persons.

Those who work with older adults will become acquainted with the self-determination, individuality, purpose, and choices exercised by older adults; regardless of their physical ability or frailty. Familiarity with these books, along with hands-on experiences with older adult nursing home residents, will increase chances for improved care models in the future. Oh, by the way, an important Learning by Living outcome not yet mentioned is that students were not eager to leave the home.

I have been saying goodbyes all day. Everyone says that they'll miss me, but I feel sure that I'll miss them more than they will miss me. My roommate has been amazing and turned out to be one of my two best friends. I have not yet packed my suitcase. I stalled but finally had to ask someone to get my suitcase down from the closet.

It is sitting on my bed, empty, and every staff member that comes in asks if I am all ready. Not at all. I haven't even started to pack and I'm not ready to do so. How am I going to say goodbye to everyone that I love tomorrow! Female medical student, The residents and staff became their friends and family, the environment their home, and the wheelchair their freedom to explore.

So pull up a three-legged stool, have a seat and prepare to teeter to and fro as you enter the culture of nursing home living—rail or rationalize, confirm or challenge, learn and lead—but please think critically and thoughtfully and keep complacency or conviction in check to aid balance.

Above all, take what you can learn from reading these books and apply that learning in the nursing home setting. Beaulieu E. A guide for nursing home social workers 2nd ed. New York: Springer Publishing Co. Damron-Rodriguez J. The state of gerontological social work education in California.

Journal of Social Work Education , 49 , — Google Scholar. Denzin N. S Handbook of qualitative research. Google Preview. Introduction: The discipline and practice of qualitative research. In Denzin N. Thousand Oaks, CA : Sage. Gugliucci M. A Defining moments: Sexuality and the care of older adults.

Journal of Geriatrics Care Managers , 22 , 1 , 4 — 9. Learning by living: Life altering medical education through nursing home based experiential learning. Lindau S. J A study of sexuality and health among older adults in the United States. The New England Journal of Medicine , , — Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

Sign In or Create an Account. Sign In. Advanced Search. Search Menu. Skip Nav Destination Article Navigation. Close mobile search navigation Article Navigation. Volume Article Contents Background. Defining Long-Term Care. The Seat of the Stool: Learning by Living. The Three Legs. Article Navigation. Gugliucci, MA, PhD. Oxford Academic. Frank J. Whittington, PhD. Cite Cite Marilyn R. Select Format Select format. Permissions Icon Permissions.

Yes, thus I can cope better with it. Faith gives me support. Some study participants overcome their grief by talking about it to others. Last time I told my GP that I have a feeling like homesickness. It is a feeling of longing for something. You are full of thoughts. And this makes you sad. I also talk about it with my children. They acknowledge that they had a loving childhood home. This makes me feel relieved. When they pick me up and take me back, I always think to myself: Here, I am not at home.

At the age of almost 90 one must be happy about this situation. One has to chat with the other nursing home residents, then it is actually quite ok. One female study participant regularly talks about her grief to her teddy bear which she took with her from home because she does not want to be a strain on her children. I need him to sleep. I took him with me from home. I talk to him, I tell him everything.

He sleeps in my bed. There, I talk to him. Some of the residents questioned are still struggling to overcome their grief. I was crying a lot. I talked about it with my doctor, and then he prescribed some medication for my nerves. Yes, because here I know all the nurses. According to Kruse and Wahl the concept of health in old age focuses on the ability to lead an autonomous and independent life despite having an illness. In this context, the individually chosen and adopted strategies to find meaningful activities are important [ 28 ].

The study participants, more often than not, downplay the offers made by the nurses to support them in the handling of their physical deficits. They refuse to believe in their shortcomings and say that they can do everything themselves, apart from cleaning and cooking. It is to be noted that the participants of this study ensure that they themselves stay mobile and independent by taking walks to the cemetery and to their former living areas, as well as by taking trips and train and bus excursions.

In particular, it is highlighted how important it is to have the opportunity to leave the nursing home without any nursing home employees at any given time. This possibility gives the nursing home residents a feeling of freedom. Yes, once a week I visit my cat at my old house. But she wants for nothing. No, I do not have any. I often go for a walk, go shopping or stroll along the river. I know some of the people who walk there. That is all I have. For one study participant it is of particular importance to have a key and thus the possibility to leave the nursing home at any time.

At dinner time I drive around the village center in my wheelchair with some friends of mine. I tell a member of staff when I leave the nursing home. This is not a problem. Sometimes I am not back before midnight.

I have a key. So, I can come and go whenever I want. Because the staff do not have to give a key to the residents. In the present study, the participants compared normality in the nursing home with their life situation at home, before they moved to the nursing home. Elderly people who are moving into a nursing home try to keep as many of their habits as possible from the good old days.

The new normality is adapted as closely as possible to their previous life. When this new normality has been accepted, this new place of living can then be seen as home. These objects from the good old times, when the study participants were younger, shape their identity and provoke positive memories. The study participants wish to partake in activities in the nursing home that are comparable to their previous hobbies and roles in life.

The activities serve to keep the residents occupied, but also to stabilise their identity. Activities give the study participants a good feeling of being useful. The children take their shoes off when they come in. I make the bed myself. I have already done something, have a look. Carnations, I look after them. In the interviews, the nursing home residents who were questioned repeatedly pointed out that they found comfort in faith. Yes, thus I can better cope with it.

The study participants partly reject social activities that are offered to them by the employees of the nursing homes. I get the pullovers from my sister, they envy me, and also my bedroom. The new nursing home residents feel healthy and wish that their physical state will not change. Some study participants express fear of becoming a person in need of care. The principal thing is not to become a nursing case. I do not want to become an invalid as some of the other residents.

I do not want to lose my mind. The elderly are realistic when it comes to the end of life. One should not become that old. If it was possible, I would like to die, yes. And now I think it is pleasant. Some study participants express the longing for death; they actually wish to die. Then I think to myself that I want to fade away now. The participants of this study are glad to have arranged everything in the case of their death.

After my son died, we bought a grave in a place where a tree had been before. We selected this place. According to Riedl et al. In the adaptation phase during the first half year in the nursing home, many of the residents feel over-challenged and unable to cope with the new situation. The other residents are perceived as a strain, and the nursing staff are seen as the ones responsible for upholding discipline and order with little time for supporting new residents.

The nursing home residents miss a private space which should be their new home. In this period, the identity of the elderly is endangered and threatens to break down [ 3 ]. On the one hand several pillars of identity were weakened by emotional pressures such as homesickness, perceived changes in the main focus of their lives, and the changed financial situation. On the other hand, the participants of this study showed that they still possessed enough emotional resources to view the move into the nursing home as reasonable after a few months.

They carefully select residents as conversation partners who do not cause emotional strain through their need for care. The willingness to talk to others instead of withdrawing helps establish their future identity [ 21 ].

The participants of this study confirmed the importance of a positive self-image by describing the physical support given by the nursing staff as completely insignificant. In the interviews, support by the nursing staff was only mentioned in the context of household activities, such as washing clothes and cleaning the floor.

Financial concerns correspond with the studies of Kane et al. The nursing home residents strive to have money of their own. According to Petzold [ 25 ], genuine personal encounters are possible when the nursing home residents exchange their experiences with each other. Thus, the first steps towards settling into the new home environment have been taken. According to Pleschberger [ 14 ], nursing home residents dignify themselves not only by their behaviour with other residents and nursing staff but also through what they have achieved during their lifetime.

Religious rituals, such as pray and regular visits to the graves of deceased family members, help the study participants cope with their entry into the nursing home. People will be identified in their environment and chosen as new friends, if they show a similar attitude to that which they exhibited prior to entering the home. The study participants ensure for themselves, through their means of coping that their changed identity remains stable and that communication with social support networks continues.

As also stated in the literature of Kruse and Wahl [ 28 ], the concept of health in old age focuses on the ability to lead an autonomous and independent life despite any illnesses. In this context, the individually chosen and adopted strategies to find meaningful activities are important.

The participants of this study say that they do not suffer from physical deficits. They do this in order to avoid being at the risk of being someone who is regarded as in need of support and of having everyday life in the nursing home organised for them by the nursing staff. The freedom to decide when you leave the nursing home and with whom ties in with the importance of maintaining the previous identity. The physical care as mentioned by Koppitz [ 10 ] is accepted at both the beginning and end of the day, but during the day the study participants strive for autonomy.

Through their own initiative, they are active and plan their everyday life themselves. In doing so, the study participants have the feeling of personal integrity, self-assertiveness and have the personal freedom in which to decide how to spend their time. Former preferences may even be reactivated. Thereby the participants of this study seem largely satisfied with their life in the nursing home.

As stated by Mateos et al. The nursing staff at the Austrian nursing homes, who was chosen for this sample study, does provide the required social support [ 8 ]. This is done by not preventing the study participants from performing their planned activities. Photos, crockery, items of clothing, and so forth strengthen their previous identity. Activities, which can no longer be performed due to being in a nursing home, such as running the household, are upheld through stories, giving these memories a positive tinge.

The study participants tell their stories and exchange their experiences every day. As confirmed by Breyl [ 7 ], this is the way in which they tie in their previous life outside of the nursing home. For example, this is how female study participants who themselves have raised children can continue their role as a mother through their stories.

As described by Heliker and Scholler-Jaquish [ 11 ], stories that are told which people have in common, manifest interest. Just as the people questioned in this study make new friends in the nursing home through the stories they share with each other. The study participants take several core areas of their lives into the nursing home with them, such as religious rituals and knowledge from their previous everyday life.

They can continue to pursue their hobbies in the nursing home or aspire to taking up a new hobby. One study participant, for example, enjoys doing handicrafts and confesses to having never had time for handicrafts before.

The study participants manage to define clear boundaries, and according to Hauge and Heggen [ 12 ] clear boundaries characterize life at home. After they have succeeded in stabilizing the pillars of their identity, even though they have moved into a nursing home, the study participants live their new identity as nursing home residents in a largely self-confident and satisfied manner after a relatively short period of time.

The participants of this study wish their families to be well and to stay healthy themselves. They rate their health status as good and hope for many more healthy years. However, they are afraid of becoming an invalid beforehand. The study participants are not afraid of dying. They know that death is a part of life. They have made all the preparations in the case of their death. Kruse [ 32 ] confirms this fact by stating that the preparation for death is a borderline situation which makes people grow and develop.

According to Kruse, elderly people have the feeling that death occurs at the right point of time in old age. Similar to the study of Mahs [ 31 ], the people questioned in this study also believe in resurrection. According to the results of this study, they find comfort and hope in faith and draw strength from it, as Petzold described, for their life in the nursing home [ 22 ]. On the one hand, the results of this study show that moving into a nursing home is a critical life experience, but on the other hand, elderly people manage to cope with this move and can create an identity for their future.

In order to be able to cope with the demand on their identity, they need identity-forming conversations in new social networks in the nursing home as well as the support from their family members and professional helpers. Figure 4 is an attempt to represent the path to a changed identity as a nursing home resident. The identity of the elderly is based on their entire previous life. Moving into a nursing home destabilizes the identity that had been lived up to that point in time.

The first challenge which the affected people face is coping with the psychophysical and social changes [ 3 ]. Every change that is accepted leads to an adaptation to the new situation. Another task in the adaptation process is to maintain autonomy and mobility in order to be able to take part in decision making and to experience a positive self-image. In doing so, progressive degeneration of competences in the elderly people can be counteracted [ 19 , 32 ].

Identity is also changeable in old age and can live up to the demands of moving into a nursing home. The new identity is formed on a mutual basis through intersubjective interaction with different people in social networks. A common bond develops by telling identity-forming stories. If this happens, nursing home residents can build a normality close to their previous normality.

A stable, changed identity Figure 4 develops. Nursing home residents take part in the decision making processes regarding life in the nursing home and thereby remain future orientated. From the results of this study, recommendations on how to act when somebody moves into a nursing home and on the adaptation phase of the elderly within the nursing home can be deduced.

Elderly residents need to be supported by their participation in decision making when selecting a nursing home, by determining the time of the entry into the nursing home, by the maintenance of a support network in and outside the nursing home, by involvement in financial matters, and by the maintenance of mobility and autonomy.

A narrative climate should be established in order to make identity-forming story telling possible. In order to be able to give nursing staff and those with political responsibility reliable recommendations for action, further quantitative, and qualitative studies are required.

The results of this study provide ideas for those areas in which further measures can be developed. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of , as selected by our Chief Editors.

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Another issue is that many nursing homes use antipsychotic drugs but. Nursing Home Abuse 3 Nursing Home Abuse As the healthcare system in this country has changed, so have traditional nursing homes. Families have the right to expect that their loved ones will be taken care of by professionals in a caring environment. Unfortunately, may people are being abused and neglected in nursing homes. It is very clear that abuse is a serious problem among nursing home patients, and something needs to be done to put a stop to it.

Abuse can happen. Essay About Nursing Home. Page 1 of 50 - About essays. Nursing Homes And The Nursing Home Facility Words 13 Pages For those who are not familiar with nursing homes , nursing homes is occupied by residents of all demographic 65 years and older with low function morbidities on their activities of daily living like eating, bathing, dressing, toileting ,transferring and continence. This leaves openings in the nursing homes that are filled with Continue Reading. Nursing Home Intervention Words 6 Pages articles is a multifactorial intervention for the prevention of falls in psychogeriatric nursing home patients, a randomised controlled trial RCT.

The study methods was divided into several section Continue Reading. Privatized Nursing Homes Words 6 Pages consistent or stable source of food for your family or yourself. In LTC and nursing homes it is advertised that, every department is involved in implementing quality management to offer the best quality of service; Continue Reading.

Nursing Home Abuse Essay Words 5 Pages discussed, nursing home residents and the elderly experience abuse sometimes on a daily basis. Types of Abuse There are many types of abuse that occur in nursing homes, even though Continue Reading. Staff members tend to cover up abuse in nursing facilities Continue Reading. Substance Abuse In Nursing Home Words 5 Pages Most government controlled homes do not get sufficient funds, so they lack trained workers and necessary equipment.

Another issue is that many nursing homes use antipsychotic drugs but Continue Reading. Abuse can happen Continue Reading. According to Mateos et al. The motives of the elderly for staying active are insufficiently taken into account. Dependent behaviour is rewarded by the staff more than independent behaviour.

The residents therefore hardly make use of their own capabilities because they feel that their abilities will be insufficiently recognised. Kane et al. According to Petzold [ 17 ], there is not enough time for fostering the competences of nursing home residents.

Moreover, Petzold describes an overcompliance by nursing home residents. They do not protest, they display a high degree of subordination, they try to pander to all levels of staff in the home, and thereby they contribute to the progressive dismantling of their own competences. As a result the level of care needs increases, mental and psychosomatic disorders occur, nursing home residents socially withdraw, and they begin to lose their identity.

Therefore entry into a nursing home constitutes a momentous and significant event and turning point in the lives of the elderly. In fact, an ever shortening life span of residents after their entry into the nursing home is noticeable. What is the experience of nursing home residents during their first year in the nursing home and how can they maintain independence and establish a social identity within the home?

In order to find the answer to this research question, a qualitative study [ 19 ] was conducted with nursing home residents in three nursing homes and homes for the elderly in the Austrian province of Salzburg. To handle the concept of identity, the Identity Theory of Petzold [ 20 — 22 ] was chosen. This means that identity develops via a process of social experiences, activities, stories, and dialogues with other people.

Life situations and conversational partners change throughout the course of life, and therefore identity is to be seen as a constantly changing process. The formation of identity never ends [ 20 ]. These changes include the alteration of living environment and bodily changes, particularly those due to age [ 22 ]. Elderly people like telling stories from former times again and again because they live in a world of memories from the past.

Reminiscing and being in a state of thinking and reflecting means that contents of the long-term memory will emerge. These stories which stabilize identity are important as the elderly generate their sense of living from their reflection of the past [ 20 ]. Therefore identity can be seen as a process that never ends and is constantly changing [ 21 ].

Identity-forming stories take place in the five essential identity areas that are described in the following. These shared experiences of the people who tell the stories mutually influence their identities for the future. The identity areas merge, and one area influences the other. The pillars are to be seen in a gender-specific manner [ 20 — 22 ]. According to Petzold [ 20 ], the level of strains placed on the identity of seniors is very high due to negative attributions and social deprivation.

The ego no longer manages to perform synthesis. The ego weakens and is no longer able to stabilize a clear identity. If the social identity weakens at the same time, then a positive identification will be missing. The identity is breaking down Figure 2. The affected nursing home residents show a deterioration in performance, emotional exhaustion, crises of self-worth, and mental symptoms, such as aggressiveness and social withdrawal [ 20 ]. In order to gain information on how the elderly experience changes to their identity in the first year after having moved into a nursing home, a qualitative study was conducted in Austria.

The study was comprised of residents from three nursing homes in the Austrian province of Salzburg. The criteria for inclusion in this sample were stays in a nursing home of less than one year, being more than 70 years old, physical and mental stability, not bed-ridden, cognitive ability to answer questions, competence to process information on the research subject, and no diagnosis of dementia.

No sample size was determined in advance. The access to the research field was gained by the first author, through contacts to the management of the nursing service of three nursing homes. The data was collected through problem-orientated interviews according to Witzel [ 24 ].

The interviewee is seen as an expert on his own opinions and actions. The interviewer asks questions in order to generate narrations, alternating with questions in order to generate understanding. In order to facilitate the implementation of the interviews, short questionnaires, guidelines, a recording device, and postscripts are used.

The basis for the guidelines was due to the result of the literature research on the identity theory of Petzold [ 20 — 22 , 25 ]. The semi-structured guidelines were divided into questions on their current life situation, review of the past, change of identity caused by moving away from home and into a nursing home, social contacts in the nursing home, and questions on expectations and wishes for the future.

Before it was applied, the guidelines were tested in a test interview with a female nursing home resident who had fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were then modified accordingly. Some extensive questions were split into two or more questions. The result of the test interview was not included in the analysis. The interview was conducted with open questions in order to give the study participants space and time to talk about their experiences.

All the study participants were asked all of the questions. However, the order of the questions was adapted to the progression of the interview. They were also conducted without a third party being present. After each interview, the results were summarized then communicated, and discussed with the interviewee. The key aspects were documented in the interview record, and the results were approved by the study participants.

The interviews were analyzed following the transcription rules for computer-assisted analysis according to Kuckartz [ 26 ] in a slightly altered form; the study participants spoke a dialect, and therefore the texts of the interviews were polished. The records of the interviews with the study participants were then imported into the text memos of the MAXQDA program [ 26 ]. The data was analyzed by means of the MAXQDA program [ 26 ] and was based on summarizing qualitative content analysis according to Mayring [ 27 ] following the nine-step process model Figure 3 material collection, descriptive analysis of the development situation, formal features of the material, trend of the analysis, theory-driven differentiation of the research question, determination of the analysis technique, definition of the analysis unit, analysis of the material, and interpretation of the results with regard to the research questions.

The results were analyzed by the first and second authors of this paper [ 19 ] in order to gain a joint agreement on the final results. All interviews were conducted in July and August, in the year Hence, theoretical saturation had been reached. The core messages of the interviews were represented by means of a category system. Five core categories were derived from the data material. When nursing home residents move into a nursing home, they have an emotionally stressful time, and they feel left alone and realise that their previous core areas of life are changing considerably.

As they move into the nursing home, they find themselves in a state of shock, which is often accompanied with tears as it dawns on them that they are losing their home. The conditions of the fellow residents puts a strain on the study participants. Due to having to go into a nursing home, identity-shaping core areas of life will change.

The study participants feel exposed to a strongly reduced financial situation. They will take all your money there. The loss of previous work gives the nursing home residents the feeling of being nothing and a nobody. At home, I used to cook for my children and grandchildren. There I had a task to fulfill. The study participants, who experienced the process of moving into a nursing home positively, highlight the advantages of living in a nursing home. In the adaptation phase, nursing home residents talk to others about their feelings, such as sorrow and home sickness.

Some study participants cope throughout the arrival period with comforting prayers. Visits to the cemetery are described as very comforting by several of the study participants and help them cope better with what they experience. In the interviews, the nursing home residents repeatedly pointed out that they found comfort in faith.

I pray often. Yes, now I have time for it. Yes, thus I can cope better with it. Faith gives me support. Some study participants overcome their grief by talking about it to others. Last time I told my GP that I have a feeling like homesickness. It is a feeling of longing for something.

You are full of thoughts. And this makes you sad. I also talk about it with my children. They acknowledge that they had a loving childhood home. This makes me feel relieved. When they pick me up and take me back, I always think to myself: Here, I am not at home.

At the age of almost 90 one must be happy about this situation. One has to chat with the other nursing home residents, then it is actually quite ok. One female study participant regularly talks about her grief to her teddy bear which she took with her from home because she does not want to be a strain on her children. I need him to sleep. I took him with me from home. I talk to him, I tell him everything. He sleeps in my bed. There, I talk to him. Some of the residents questioned are still struggling to overcome their grief.

I was crying a lot. I talked about it with my doctor, and then he prescribed some medication for my nerves. Yes, because here I know all the nurses. According to Kruse and Wahl the concept of health in old age focuses on the ability to lead an autonomous and independent life despite having an illness. In this context, the individually chosen and adopted strategies to find meaningful activities are important [ 28 ]. The study participants, more often than not, downplay the offers made by the nurses to support them in the handling of their physical deficits.

They refuse to believe in their shortcomings and say that they can do everything themselves, apart from cleaning and cooking. It is to be noted that the participants of this study ensure that they themselves stay mobile and independent by taking walks to the cemetery and to their former living areas, as well as by taking trips and train and bus excursions.

In particular, it is highlighted how important it is to have the opportunity to leave the nursing home without any nursing home employees at any given time. This possibility gives the nursing home residents a feeling of freedom. Yes, once a week I visit my cat at my old house. But she wants for nothing. No, I do not have any. I often go for a walk, go shopping or stroll along the river. I know some of the people who walk there. That is all I have.

For one study participant it is of particular importance to have a key and thus the possibility to leave the nursing home at any time. At dinner time I drive around the village center in my wheelchair with some friends of mine. I tell a member of staff when I leave the nursing home. This is not a problem. Sometimes I am not back before midnight.

I have a key. So, I can come and go whenever I want. Because the staff do not have to give a key to the residents. In the present study, the participants compared normality in the nursing home with their life situation at home, before they moved to the nursing home. Elderly people who are moving into a nursing home try to keep as many of their habits as possible from the good old days. The new normality is adapted as closely as possible to their previous life.

When this new normality has been accepted, this new place of living can then be seen as home. These objects from the good old times, when the study participants were younger, shape their identity and provoke positive memories. The study participants wish to partake in activities in the nursing home that are comparable to their previous hobbies and roles in life.

The activities serve to keep the residents occupied, but also to stabilise their identity. Activities give the study participants a good feeling of being useful. The children take their shoes off when they come in. I make the bed myself.

I have already done something, have a look. Carnations, I look after them. In the interviews, the nursing home residents who were questioned repeatedly pointed out that they found comfort in faith. Yes, thus I can better cope with it. The study participants partly reject social activities that are offered to them by the employees of the nursing homes.

I get the pullovers from my sister, they envy me, and also my bedroom. The new nursing home residents feel healthy and wish that their physical state will not change. Some study participants express fear of becoming a person in need of care.

The principal thing is not to become a nursing case. I do not want to become an invalid as some of the other residents. I do not want to lose my mind. The elderly are realistic when it comes to the end of life. One should not become that old. If it was possible, I would like to die, yes. And now I think it is pleasant.

Some study participants express the longing for death; they actually wish to die. Then I think to myself that I want to fade away now. The participants of this study are glad to have arranged everything in the case of their death. After my son died, we bought a grave in a place where a tree had been before. We selected this place. According to Riedl et al. In the adaptation phase during the first half year in the nursing home, many of the residents feel over-challenged and unable to cope with the new situation.

The other residents are perceived as a strain, and the nursing staff are seen as the ones responsible for upholding discipline and order with little time for supporting new residents.

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However, with the local population, it seems that most stay in their homes without moving into nursing homes. This leaves openings in the nursing homes that are filled with. The aunthers did a great job of explained how can deal and prevent falls in the nursing homes. The study methods was divided into several section.

In addition the quality of nursing homes and long term care is determined by privatized companies who end goal is to make profits. In LTC and nursing homes it is advertised that, every department is involved in implementing quality management to offer the best quality of service;. Medical errors, physical abuse, or stealing from them could all be classified as abuse. All around the world today, a population that is not able to help itself is being harmed, whether it is physical or sexual abuse, exploitation, or not being properly supervised; the elderly and nursing home residents are being abused.

Types of Abuse There are many types of abuse that occur in nursing homes, even though. Abuse in nursing homes occurs more than the average person would think. Abuse is a factor that needs to be addressed as a very serious issue because it can later lead to death. There are various types of abuse in the world, many of which occur in nursing homes and go unreported. Many injuries cause patients to have broken bones and death. In addition, patient abuse can lead to having psychological disorders like anxiety and depression.

Staff members tend to cover up abuse in nursing facilities. Most government controlled homes do not get sufficient funds, so they lack trained workers and necessary equipment. Another issue is that many nursing homes use antipsychotic drugs but. Nursing Home Abuse 3 Nursing Home Abuse As the healthcare system in this country has changed, so have traditional nursing homes.

Families have the right to expect that their loved ones will be taken care of by professionals in a caring environment. Unfortunately, may people are being abused and neglected in nursing homes. One has to chat with the other nursing home residents, then it is actually quite ok. One female study participant regularly talks about her grief to her teddy bear which she took with her from home because she does not want to be a strain on her children.

I need him to sleep. I took him with me from home. I talk to him, I tell him everything. He sleeps in my bed. There, I talk to him. Some of the residents questioned are still struggling to overcome their grief. I was crying a lot. I talked about it with my doctor, and then he prescribed some medication for my nerves. Yes, because here I know all the nurses. According to Kruse and Wahl the concept of health in old age focuses on the ability to lead an autonomous and independent life despite having an illness.

In this context, the individually chosen and adopted strategies to find meaningful activities are important [ 28 ]. The study participants, more often than not, downplay the offers made by the nurses to support them in the handling of their physical deficits. They refuse to believe in their shortcomings and say that they can do everything themselves, apart from cleaning and cooking. It is to be noted that the participants of this study ensure that they themselves stay mobile and independent by taking walks to the cemetery and to their former living areas, as well as by taking trips and train and bus excursions.

In particular, it is highlighted how important it is to have the opportunity to leave the nursing home without any nursing home employees at any given time. This possibility gives the nursing home residents a feeling of freedom. Yes, once a week I visit my cat at my old house. But she wants for nothing. No, I do not have any. I often go for a walk, go shopping or stroll along the river. I know some of the people who walk there. That is all I have. For one study participant it is of particular importance to have a key and thus the possibility to leave the nursing home at any time.

At dinner time I drive around the village center in my wheelchair with some friends of mine. I tell a member of staff when I leave the nursing home. This is not a problem. Sometimes I am not back before midnight. I have a key. So, I can come and go whenever I want. Because the staff do not have to give a key to the residents. In the present study, the participants compared normality in the nursing home with their life situation at home, before they moved to the nursing home.

Elderly people who are moving into a nursing home try to keep as many of their habits as possible from the good old days. The new normality is adapted as closely as possible to their previous life. When this new normality has been accepted, this new place of living can then be seen as home. These objects from the good old times, when the study participants were younger, shape their identity and provoke positive memories.

The study participants wish to partake in activities in the nursing home that are comparable to their previous hobbies and roles in life. The activities serve to keep the residents occupied, but also to stabilise their identity. Activities give the study participants a good feeling of being useful.

The children take their shoes off when they come in. I make the bed myself. I have already done something, have a look. Carnations, I look after them. In the interviews, the nursing home residents who were questioned repeatedly pointed out that they found comfort in faith. Yes, thus I can better cope with it. The study participants partly reject social activities that are offered to them by the employees of the nursing homes. I get the pullovers from my sister, they envy me, and also my bedroom.

The new nursing home residents feel healthy and wish that their physical state will not change. Some study participants express fear of becoming a person in need of care. The principal thing is not to become a nursing case. I do not want to become an invalid as some of the other residents. I do not want to lose my mind. The elderly are realistic when it comes to the end of life. One should not become that old. If it was possible, I would like to die, yes.

And now I think it is pleasant. Some study participants express the longing for death; they actually wish to die. Then I think to myself that I want to fade away now. The participants of this study are glad to have arranged everything in the case of their death. After my son died, we bought a grave in a place where a tree had been before. We selected this place. According to Riedl et al. In the adaptation phase during the first half year in the nursing home, many of the residents feel over-challenged and unable to cope with the new situation.

The other residents are perceived as a strain, and the nursing staff are seen as the ones responsible for upholding discipline and order with little time for supporting new residents. The nursing home residents miss a private space which should be their new home. In this period, the identity of the elderly is endangered and threatens to break down [ 3 ]. On the one hand several pillars of identity were weakened by emotional pressures such as homesickness, perceived changes in the main focus of their lives, and the changed financial situation.

On the other hand, the participants of this study showed that they still possessed enough emotional resources to view the move into the nursing home as reasonable after a few months. They carefully select residents as conversation partners who do not cause emotional strain through their need for care.

The willingness to talk to others instead of withdrawing helps establish their future identity [ 21 ]. The participants of this study confirmed the importance of a positive self-image by describing the physical support given by the nursing staff as completely insignificant. In the interviews, support by the nursing staff was only mentioned in the context of household activities, such as washing clothes and cleaning the floor.

Financial concerns correspond with the studies of Kane et al. The nursing home residents strive to have money of their own. According to Petzold [ 25 ], genuine personal encounters are possible when the nursing home residents exchange their experiences with each other.

Thus, the first steps towards settling into the new home environment have been taken. According to Pleschberger [ 14 ], nursing home residents dignify themselves not only by their behaviour with other residents and nursing staff but also through what they have achieved during their lifetime.

Religious rituals, such as pray and regular visits to the graves of deceased family members, help the study participants cope with their entry into the nursing home. People will be identified in their environment and chosen as new friends, if they show a similar attitude to that which they exhibited prior to entering the home.

The study participants ensure for themselves, through their means of coping that their changed identity remains stable and that communication with social support networks continues. As also stated in the literature of Kruse and Wahl [ 28 ], the concept of health in old age focuses on the ability to lead an autonomous and independent life despite any illnesses.

In this context, the individually chosen and adopted strategies to find meaningful activities are important. The participants of this study say that they do not suffer from physical deficits. They do this in order to avoid being at the risk of being someone who is regarded as in need of support and of having everyday life in the nursing home organised for them by the nursing staff.

The freedom to decide when you leave the nursing home and with whom ties in with the importance of maintaining the previous identity. The physical care as mentioned by Koppitz [ 10 ] is accepted at both the beginning and end of the day, but during the day the study participants strive for autonomy. Through their own initiative, they are active and plan their everyday life themselves.

In doing so, the study participants have the feeling of personal integrity, self-assertiveness and have the personal freedom in which to decide how to spend their time. Former preferences may even be reactivated. Thereby the participants of this study seem largely satisfied with their life in the nursing home. As stated by Mateos et al. The nursing staff at the Austrian nursing homes, who was chosen for this sample study, does provide the required social support [ 8 ].

This is done by not preventing the study participants from performing their planned activities. Photos, crockery, items of clothing, and so forth strengthen their previous identity. Activities, which can no longer be performed due to being in a nursing home, such as running the household, are upheld through stories, giving these memories a positive tinge. The study participants tell their stories and exchange their experiences every day. As confirmed by Breyl [ 7 ], this is the way in which they tie in their previous life outside of the nursing home.

For example, this is how female study participants who themselves have raised children can continue their role as a mother through their stories. As described by Heliker and Scholler-Jaquish [ 11 ], stories that are told which people have in common, manifest interest.

Just as the people questioned in this study make new friends in the nursing home through the stories they share with each other. The study participants take several core areas of their lives into the nursing home with them, such as religious rituals and knowledge from their previous everyday life. They can continue to pursue their hobbies in the nursing home or aspire to taking up a new hobby. One study participant, for example, enjoys doing handicrafts and confesses to having never had time for handicrafts before.

The study participants manage to define clear boundaries, and according to Hauge and Heggen [ 12 ] clear boundaries characterize life at home. After they have succeeded in stabilizing the pillars of their identity, even though they have moved into a nursing home, the study participants live their new identity as nursing home residents in a largely self-confident and satisfied manner after a relatively short period of time.

The participants of this study wish their families to be well and to stay healthy themselves. They rate their health status as good and hope for many more healthy years. However, they are afraid of becoming an invalid beforehand. The study participants are not afraid of dying. They know that death is a part of life. They have made all the preparations in the case of their death. Kruse [ 32 ] confirms this fact by stating that the preparation for death is a borderline situation which makes people grow and develop.

According to Kruse, elderly people have the feeling that death occurs at the right point of time in old age. Similar to the study of Mahs [ 31 ], the people questioned in this study also believe in resurrection. According to the results of this study, they find comfort and hope in faith and draw strength from it, as Petzold described, for their life in the nursing home [ 22 ]. On the one hand, the results of this study show that moving into a nursing home is a critical life experience, but on the other hand, elderly people manage to cope with this move and can create an identity for their future.

In order to be able to cope with the demand on their identity, they need identity-forming conversations in new social networks in the nursing home as well as the support from their family members and professional helpers. Figure 4 is an attempt to represent the path to a changed identity as a nursing home resident.

The identity of the elderly is based on their entire previous life. Moving into a nursing home destabilizes the identity that had been lived up to that point in time. The first challenge which the affected people face is coping with the psychophysical and social changes [ 3 ].

Every change that is accepted leads to an adaptation to the new situation. Another task in the adaptation process is to maintain autonomy and mobility in order to be able to take part in decision making and to experience a positive self-image. In doing so, progressive degeneration of competences in the elderly people can be counteracted [ 19 , 32 ].

Identity is also changeable in old age and can live up to the demands of moving into a nursing home. The new identity is formed on a mutual basis through intersubjective interaction with different people in social networks. A common bond develops by telling identity-forming stories. If this happens, nursing home residents can build a normality close to their previous normality. A stable, changed identity Figure 4 develops. Nursing home residents take part in the decision making processes regarding life in the nursing home and thereby remain future orientated.

From the results of this study, recommendations on how to act when somebody moves into a nursing home and on the adaptation phase of the elderly within the nursing home can be deduced. Elderly residents need to be supported by their participation in decision making when selecting a nursing home, by determining the time of the entry into the nursing home, by the maintenance of a support network in and outside the nursing home, by involvement in financial matters, and by the maintenance of mobility and autonomy.

A narrative climate should be established in order to make identity-forming story telling possible. In order to be able to give nursing staff and those with political responsibility reliable recommendations for action, further quantitative, and qualitative studies are required.

The results of this study provide ideas for those areas in which further measures can be developed. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of , as selected by our Chief Editors.

Read the winning articles. Journal overview. Special Issues. Academic Editor: Lis Wagner. Received 14 Dec Accepted 28 Feb Published 04 Apr Abstract Going into a nursing home can turn out to be a critical life experience if elderly people are afraid of losing their independence and identity after having moved into a nursing home. Research Question What is the experience of nursing home residents during their first year in the nursing home and how can they maintain independence and establish a social identity within the home?

Framework To handle the concept of identity, the Identity Theory of Petzold [ 20 — 22 ] was chosen. Figure 1. Five pillars of identity by Petzold own drawing. Figure 2. Figure 3. Process model of the qualitative data analysis illustration compiled by the author.

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