5 minute oral book report

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5 minute oral book report

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All Resource Types. Results for oral book report rubric results. Sort: Relevance. Literature , Oral Communication , Reading. Rubrics , Activities , Assessment. Show more details. Add to cart. Wish List. Written and Oral Book Report book talk Rubrics. Word Document File.

This file includes both a written book report rubric and a book talk rubric. Both rubrics are out of 21 points and focus on the elements of genre, characters, setting, and plot. Writing , Reading. Projects , Assessment , Novel Study. Oral book reports are a great tool to use in the classroom ensuring your students are reading and comprehending the reading. It also helps them build confidence by presenting in front of the class.

I created this Oral book report, rubric and use it during the year. I also created and use the written. English Language Arts , Writing , Reading. Allow flexibility! Provide differentiation! Students pick their OWN novel or short story Literature , Close Reading , Reading. Not Grade Specific. Unit Plans , Assessment , Novel Study. This is a more creative substitute for the traditional book report which allows students to create a new book cover for a book they have read.

It is a carefully planned out assignment involving a student project and oral presentation. It is a two page handout in Microsoft Word, and also includes a. English Language Arts , Reading. Projects , Handouts. Here are some fun projects to do once students are finished with a Book Club or Literature Circle.

English Language Arts , Literature , Reading. Activities , Assessment , Other. My students are responsible for two oral book report presentations each year. While I use this rubric to assess their report, the true shift in my classroom came from having every student assess their peers' oral presentations. The rubric has guided every student in the type of constructive criticis.

Projects , Rubrics , Assessment. Oral Book Report Rubric. I know how long it takes to create rubrics. This will save you time by purchasing the rubrics I have created. I have created 2 rubrics for book reports. One is for a written book report, the other is for an oral book report. Thank you for your purchase. Rubrics , Assessment , Printables.

Here is a detailed rubric containing several different grading components to use for an oral book report for upper grades My DJ Inkers license number is English Language Arts , Oral Communication. Oral Book Report Guidelines and Rubric. These are the guidelines, example, and rubric I use in the 7th grade ELA classroom. I have the students transfer their outlines in ink on a large index card to present.

We complete two oral book reports in the year. This is a great way to get those speaking and listening standards covered in your c. Assessment , Outlines , Novel Study. Storytelling Oral Book Report and Rubric. Students read a folktalke and retell it to class in minute presentation.

Rubric for presentation included. English Language Arts , Literature , Drama. Rubrics , Other. Use this when having assigned an oral book report. Mystery Genre Case File Book Report ProjectStudents put on their detective hats while they read a mystery book, creating a case file of evidence to solve the mystery. Literature , Writing , Reading. Projects , Literacy Center Ideas , Printables. This project is perfect for teaching point of view during the month of Halloween or any time of year, and can also be used during distance learning.

Students choose a favorite character from a story they have read. They produce a written book report, do an oral presentation where they speak from the. Projects , Printables. Instead of an essay every time, I create different projects to do. As my s. Gifted and Talented , Balanced Literacy , Reading. Projects , Homeschool Curricula , Printables. As my scho. As my school is Title.

Gifted and Talented , Writing , Reading. This Career Research Report allows students the opportunity to explore what they want to be when they grow up. They begin with an interest survey and end with a career fair. Students get so excited about this unit because it means something to them.

It makes all of the reading, writing, listening, a. Projects , Rubrics , Research. As my school i. As my school is Title 1, I. This Fantasy Book Report package allows students to choose their own book, identify the elements of fantasy, write about the elements, creatively publish and assemble their report, and present to their class. English Language Arts , Literature , Writing. Assessment , Novel Study , Printables. As my sch. This is an awesome alternative to the standard book report and students really enjoy this form of assessment.

It is adaptable and easy to assess. I have included a 4 point rubric for both the paper bag book report itself and the oral presentation you may or may not want to do this as a part of th. Projects , Activities , Assessment. Limit reading text to quotes or to specific points you want to emphasize.

Search this Guide Search. Organizing Your Social Sciences Research Paper Offers detailed guidance on how to develop, organize, and write a college-level research paper in the social and behavioral sciences. The Abstract Executive Summary 4. The Introduction The C. The Discussion Limitations of the Study 9. The Conclusion Appendices Preparing for Your Oral Presentation In some classes, writing the research paper is only part of what is required in regards to presenting your work.

Oral communication is different from written communication Your audience has just one chance to hear your talk; they can't "re-read" your words if they get confused. Think about your audience Yes, you want to demonstrate to your professor that you have conducted a good study.

Create effective notes If you don't have notes to refer to as you speak, you run the risk of forgetting something important. Strategies for creating effective notes for yourself include the following: Choose a large, readable font [at least 18 point in Ariel ]; avoid using fancy text fonts or cursive text.

Use bold text, underlining, or different-colored text to highlight elements of your speech that you want to emphasize. Don't over do it, though. Only highlight the most important elements of your presentation. Leave adequate space on your notes to jot down additional thoughts or observations before and during your presentation.

This is also helpful when writing down your thoughts in response to a question or to remember a multi-part question [remember to have a pen with you when you give your presentation]. Place a cue in the text of your notes to indicate when to move to the next slide, to click on a link, or to take some other action, such as, linking to a video. If appropriate, include a cue in your notes if there is a point during your presentation when you want the audience to refer to a handout.

Spell out challenging words phonetically and practice saying them ahead of time. Organizing the Content Begin by thinking about what you want to achieve and how are you going to involve your audience in the presentation. Brainstorm your topic and write a rough outline. Organize your material and draft what you want to say [see below].

Prepare your visual aids. Rehearse your presentation and practice getting the presentation completed within the time limit given by your professor. Ask a friend to listen and time you. Begin with a question, an amusing story, a provocative statement, or anything that will engage your audience and make them think. State your purpose.

The Body Present your main points one by one in a logical order. Pause at the end of each point. Give people time to take notes, or time to think about what you are saying. Make it clear when you move to another point. If appropriate, consider using visual aids to make your presentation more interesting [e. The Conclusion Leave your audience with a clear summary of everything that you have covered.

Summarize the main points again. For example, use phrases like: "So, in conclusion Make it obvious that you have reached the end of the presentation. Thank the audience, and invite questions : "Thank you. Are there any questions? Delivering Your Presentation When delivering your presentation, keep in mind the following points to help you remain focused and ensure that everything goes as planned.

Keep it simple. The aim is to communicate, not to show off your vocabulary. Using complex words or phrases increases the chance of stumbling over a word and losing your train of thought. Emphasize the key points. Make sure people realize which are the key points of your study. Repeat them using different phrasing to help the audience remember them.

Check the pronunciation of difficult, unusual, or foreign words beforehand. Keep it simple, but if you have to use unfamiliar words, write them out phonetically in your notes and practice saying them. This is particularly important when pronouncing proper names. Give the definition of words that are unusual or are being used in a particular context [e. Use your voice to communicate clearly Speak loudly enough for everyone in the room to hear you.

Projecting your voice may feel uncomfortably loud at first, but if people can't hear you, they won't try to listen. However, moderate your voice if you are talking in front of a microphone. Speak slowly and clearly. Speaking fast makes it harder for people to understand you and signals being nervous.

Avoid the use of "fillers. They occur most often during transitions from one idea to another and, if expressed too much, are distracting to an audience. The better you know your presentation, the better you can control these verbal tics. Vary your voice quality. If you always use the same volume and pitch [for example, all loud, or all soft, or in a monotone] during your presentation, your audience will stop listening. Use a higher pitch and volume in your voice when you begin a new point or when emphasizing the transition to a new point.

Speakers with accents need to slow down [so do most others]. Non-native speakers often speak English faster than we slow-mouthed native speakers, usually because most non-English languages flow more quickly than English. Slowing down helps the audience to comprehend what you are saying. Slow down for key points. These are also moments in your presentation to consider using body language, such as hand gestures or leaving the podium to point to a slide, to help emphasize key points.

Use pauses. Don't be afraid of short periods of silence. They give you a chance to gather your thoughts, and your audience an opportunity to think about what you've just said. Stand straight and comfortably. Do not slouch or shuffle about. If you appear bored or uninterested in what your talking about, the audience will emulate this as well.

Wear something comfortable. This is not the time to wear an itchy wool sweater or new high heel shoes for the first time. Hold your head up. Look around and make eye contact with people in the audience [or at least pretend to]. Do not just look at your professor or your notes the whole time!

Looking up at your your audience brings them into the conversation. If you don't include the audience, they won't listen to you. When you are talking to your friends, you naturally use your hands, your facial expression, and your body to add to your communication. Do it in your presentation as well. It will make things far more interesting for the audience. Don't turn your back on the audience and don't fidget! Neither moving around nor standing still is wrong.

Practice either to make yourself comfortable.

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All Resource Types. Results for oral book report results. Sort: Relevance. This project is perfect for teaching point of view during the month of Halloween or any time of year, and can also be used during distance learning. Students choose a favorite character from a story they have read. They produce a written book report, do an oral presentation where they speak from the.

English Language Arts , Writing , Reading. Projects , Printables. Show more details. Add to cart. Wish List. Literature , Oral Communication , Reading. Rubrics , Activities , Assessment. Written and Oral Book Report book talk Rubrics.

Word Document File. This file includes both a written book report rubric and a book talk rubric. Both rubrics are out of 21 points and focus on the elements of genre, characters, setting, and plot. Writing , Reading. Projects , Assessment , Novel Study. Oral book reports are a great tool to use in the classroom ensuring your students are reading and comprehending the reading. It also helps them build confidence by presenting in front of the class.

I created this Oral book report, rubric and use it during the year. I also created and use the written. Oral Book Report Interview. Because if you are anything like me, you get tired of grading papers! This allows you to more fully check for comprehension and completion when it comes to students' reading.

This packet provides a list of questions to ask students in 5 categories: Honest Answers 1 , Facts and Short Responses 4. Activities , Assessment , Novel Study. Allow flexibility! Provide differentiation! Students pick their OWN novel or short story Literature , Close Reading , Reading.

Not Grade Specific. Unit Plans , Assessment , Novel Study. This is a more creative substitute for the traditional book report which allows students to create a new book cover for a book they have read. It is a carefully planned out assignment involving a student project and oral presentation. It is a two page handout in Microsoft Word, and also includes a. English Language Arts , Reading.

Projects , Handouts. Here are some fun projects to do once students are finished with a Book Club or Literature Circle. English Language Arts , Literature , Reading. Activities , Assessment , Other. In addition: Ideas for cyber book reports! Are you a teacher who keeps saying "I wish I could find a way to make book reports more fun and interesting for my students"? Education World offers 25 ideas that might help you do just that!

In a recent posting to the Teachers. The teacher commissioned a friend to draw slices of ham, tomato, and Swiss cheese; lettuce leaves; a layer of mayonnaise, and a couple of slices of bread. Then she photocopied the drawings onto appropriately colored sheets of paper -- ham on pink, tomato on red, Swiss cheese on yellow, etc.

The sheets served as the ingredients for her students' book report sandwiches. Students stapled together their sandwich layers, then slapped their concoctions up on a bulletin board headlined "We're Hungry for Good Books! The project made fun out of what can be a pretty hum-drum activity. Even better, the bulletin board served as a menu for students who were ravenous for a good read. All they had to do was grab a sandwich to learn whether a particular book might satisfy their appetites!

Laura Hayden was looking for something to liven up book report writing for her students at Derby Kansas Middle School. One day, while exploring postings to the MiddleWeb Listserv , Hayden found an idea that filled the bill! Hayden challenged her students to be creative with the "Book in a After choosing and reading a book, each student selected a book report container.

The container could be a plastic bag, a manila envelope, a can, or anything else that might be appropriate for a book. Students decorated their containers to convey some of the major details, elements, or themes found in the books. When the containers were complete, students went to work on the contents of their containers.

They were instructed to include the following:. The third and final part of the project was the student presentation. Each student presented a "Book in a" project to the class. In the presentation, the student explained the connection of the container to the story, conducted a show and tell about the five things, and then shared information about three of the book's literary elements -- setting, characters, conflicts, climax, or resolution.

If you've been working on other literary elements with your students -- foreshadowing, personification, or flashbacks, for example -- you might give extra credit to students for pointing out those elements in their books. Why not challenge your students' creativity?

Adapt Hayden's idea to fit your students' needs and skills. Are you worried that some of the ideas that follow will be too much fun? Take a look! If an idea doesn't include enough writing, creative sneaky! Descriptive writing. Use this activity to supplement a class lesson in descriptive prose writing. Have each student read aloud the best example of descriptive prose found in the book he or she is currently reading.

The student should write a paragraph explaining why the excerpt is a particularly good example of descriptive prose. The paragraph might include some of the adjectives the author used to set the scene. Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down. Each student writes a review of the book he or she just finished reading -- in the style of a movie review. The student concludes by awarding a thumbs up or thumbs down on the book.

This activity could be even more fun if two students read the same book. They could plan a lively interaction, a la and Ebert and Roeper, about the book, which could be videotaped for all to see! Character Trait Diagram. Each student creates a Venn diagram to illustrate similarities and differences in the traits of two of the main characters in a book just completed. A student might elect to create a Venn diagram showing similarities and differences between the book's main character and the student!

Surfing the Net. Where did the story take place? When did it take place? Each student surfs the Net to find five Internet sites that others might check out before they read the book so they will know more about the book's setting or time period. Write a Letter to the Author.

After reading a book, each student shares reactions to the book in a letter written to its author. If a student writes to an author who is still alive, you might actually mail the letter. Sell It. Each student pretends to be a publicist for the book that's just been read. The student writes and then delivers a second speech that will persuade other students that they should read the book.

Writing and speaking persuasively will be especially difficult if the student didn't like the book. If that's the case, the student can share that fact after completing the speech. Create a Card Catalog. After reading a book, a student completes an index card with information about the book.

The front of the card includes details such as title, author, and date published along with a two- to three-sentence synopsis of the book. On the back of the card, the student writes a paragraph critiquing the book. Students might even rate the book using a teacher-created five-star rating system. Example: A five-star book is "highly recommended; a book you can't put down. Interview a Character.

Each student composes six to eight questions to ask a main character in a book just completed. The student also writes the character's response to each question. The questions and answers should provide information that shows the student read the book without giving away the most significant details.

Ten Facts. Each student creates a "Ten Facts About [book title]" sheet that lists ten facts he or she learned from reading the book. The facts, written in complete sentences, must include details the student didn't know before reading the book. Script It! Each student writes a movie script for a favorite scene in a book just read.

At the top of the script, the student can assign real-life TV or movie stars to play each role. The student might also work with classmates to perform the favorite scene. Each student will need 30 index cards to create a Concentration-style game related to a book just finished. The student chooses 14 things, characters, or events that played a part in the book and creates two cards that have identical pictures of each of those things. The two remaining cards are marked Wild Card!

Then the student turns all 30 cards facedown and mixes them up. Each student can choose a partner with whom to play according to the rules of Concentration. What Did You Learn? Each student writes a summary of what he or she learned from a book just completed. The summary might include factual information, something learned about people in general, or something the student learned about himself or herself. Glossary and Word Search. Each student creates a glossary of ten or more words that are specific to a book's tone, setting, or characters.

The student defines each word and writes a sentence from the book that includes that word. Then the student creates a word search puzzle that includes the glossary words. Students can exchange their glossaries and word searches with others in the class. In the News. Each student creates the front page of a newspaper that tells about events and characters in a book just read. The newspaper page might include weather reports, an editorial or editorial cartoon, ads, etc.

The title of the newspaper should be something appropriate to the book. Create a Comic Book. Each student can turn a book, or part of it, into a comic book, complete with comic-style illustrations and dialogue bubbles. Characters Come to Life. Each student creates life-size "portraits" of one of the characters from a book just read. The portrait should include a written piece that tells about the character.

The piece might also include information about events, traits, or conflicts in the book that involve that character. Hang the students' portraits in a class gallery. Prove It in Five Minutes. Each student gives a second 2-minute oral presentation in which he or she shares information about a book's plot and characters.

The student closes the presentation by offering an opinion and recommendation about the book. Then students in the audience have seconds to question the presenter about the book. If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it. Picture Books. After reading a book, each student creates a picture book version of the story that would appeal to younger students. The students can then share the picture books with a group of young students.

Resume Writing. As a tie-in to your career education program, challenge each student to create a resume for a book character. The student should include in the resume a statement of the applicant's goals and a detailed account of his or her experience and outside interests. Character Trait Chart. Each student creates a chart with three columns. Each column is headed with the name of one of the book's characters. As the student reads the book, he or she can keep a record of the traits each character possesses and include an incident that supports each trait.

Theme Report. Challenge each student to select a concept or a thing from the book just finished and to use library or Internet resources to explore it further. The student then writes a two-page report that shares information about the topic. To learn more about the setting of a book, each student writes a one-page report explaining how that setting was important to the story.

The entries should share details about the story that will prove the student read the book. You can find curated collections of high-interest fiction and non-fiction texts at Steps to Literacy. Steps to Literacy offers inclusive and differentiated collections of age and developmentally appropriate books and resources that engage students and foster a love for reading within each of them.

Learn more about building your own customized classroom library. Leave this field blank. Search Search. Newsletter Sign Up. Search form Search. Make A Book Report Sandwich! Her idea: book report sandwiches!

HOW TO WRITE A BOOK BIO

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Independent Work Packet. Interactive Notebooks. Interactive Whiteboard. Internet Activities. Lesson Plans Bundled. Literature Circles. Movie Guides. Nonfiction Book Study. Novel Study. Original Textbooks. PowerPoint Presentations. Professional Documents. Reflective Journals for Teachers. What Did You Learn?

Each student writes a summary of what he or she learned from a book just completed. The summary might include factual information, something learned about people in general, or something the student learned about himself or herself. Glossary and Word Search. Each student creates a glossary of ten or more words that are specific to a book's tone, setting, or characters.

The student defines each word and writes a sentence from the book that includes that word. Then the student creates a word search puzzle that includes the glossary words. Students can exchange their glossaries and word searches with others in the class. In the News. Each student creates the front page of a newspaper that tells about events and characters in a book just read. The newspaper page might include weather reports, an editorial or editorial cartoon, ads, etc.

The title of the newspaper should be something appropriate to the book. Create a Comic Book. Each student can turn a book, or part of it, into a comic book, complete with comic-style illustrations and dialogue bubbles. Characters Come to Life. Each student creates life-size "portraits" of one of the characters from a book just read. The portrait should include a written piece that tells about the character. The piece might also include information about events, traits, or conflicts in the book that involve that character.

Hang the students' portraits in a class gallery. Prove It in Five Minutes. Each student gives a second 2-minute oral presentation in which he or she shares information about a book's plot and characters.

The student closes the presentation by offering an opinion and recommendation about the book. Then students in the audience have seconds to question the presenter about the book. If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it.

Picture Books. After reading a book, each student creates a picture book version of the story that would appeal to younger students. The students can then share the picture books with a group of young students. Resume Writing. As a tie-in to your career education program, challenge each student to create a resume for a book character. The student should include in the resume a statement of the applicant's goals and a detailed account of his or her experience and outside interests.

Character Trait Chart. Each student creates a chart with three columns. Each column is headed with the name of one of the book's characters. As the student reads the book, he or she can keep a record of the traits each character possesses and include an incident that supports each trait.

Theme Report. Challenge each student to select a concept or a thing from the book just finished and to use library or Internet resources to explore it further. The student then writes a two-page report that shares information about the topic. To learn more about the setting of a book, each student writes a one-page report explaining how that setting was important to the story.

The entries should share details about the story that will prove the student read the book. You can find curated collections of high-interest fiction and non-fiction texts at Steps to Literacy. Steps to Literacy offers inclusive and differentiated collections of age and developmentally appropriate books and resources that engage students and foster a love for reading within each of them. Learn more about building your own customized classroom library.

Leave this field blank. Search Search. Newsletter Sign Up. Search form Search. Make A Book Report Sandwich! Her idea: book report sandwiches! On the top slice of bread, each student wrote the title and the author of the book the student had just finished reading. On the lettuce, the student wrote a brief summary of the book. The student wrote about the main character on the tomato slice.

On the mayonnaise, the student described the book's setting. The student shared the book's climax on the Swiss cheese. On the ham slice, the student described the plot. On the bottom piece of bread, the student drew a favorite scene from the story. They were instructed to include the following: Questions Write ten questions based on the book. Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking.

Vocabulary Create a ten-word glossary of unfamiliar words from the book. Things Include five things that have a connection to the story. The ideas appeal to many different learning styles. Many of the ideas involve making choices, organizing information -- and writing! Most of the ideas will provide teachers with a clear idea about whether students actually read the book. And all the ideas will engage students, help make books come alive for them, and challenge them to think in different ways about the books they read!

Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt! Struggling Students?

You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class? The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths. You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement. Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward.

Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing. Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges.

Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs. There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate. We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list.

Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students. Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers. Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others. Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom.

Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner. Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student. Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates! Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards? Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique.

Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters. Desperate measures are called for! Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities.

Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well. Discuss how sports affect the lives of fans as well as players. Ask students to tell about an occasion when sports positively or negatively affected their own lives. Students might also be inspired to write their own poems about baseball.

History -- write about baseball history. Arrange students into groups and assign each group a period of time from to the present. Encourage each group to share its report with the class. Students might also create a timeline of the highlights of baseball history and display it, with their reports, on a classroom or hallway bulletin board. Math -- figuring averages. Invite students to explore the information about batting averages at Mathletics: Baseball.

Then provide them with information about hits and at-bats for a fictional baseball team and ask them to determine the batting averages of each player. If you teach older students, you might share A Graphical History of Baseball. Then challenge students to plot the averages over the years of their favorite team.

Art -- design a stamp. Encourage students to read about the history of Baseball On Stamps, then invite them to design a stamp honoring their own favorite player or players. Speech and drama -- present a skit. Math -- set player salaries. Challenge students to imagine that Major League Baseball has decided to do away with long-term contracts and set players' salaries based on their performance the previous year. Arrange students into groups. Agree as a class on certain criteria that will guide salary considerations.

For example, agree on the position players you will examine students might examine the 15 field players on the team who had at least at-bats in the previous year how much money a team is allowed to spend on its eight starting fielders whether to pay all rookie players a base salary or base their salary on the previous year in the minor leagues Assign each group a different team.

The groups must agree on a way to measure the offensive performance of their 15 players, create a table on which they will display the previous year's stats, and come up with "fair salaries" that reflect the abilities of the players based on the previous year's data. Language arts -- use it in a sentence. Point out to students that a number of baseball-related terms, such as batting , struck out, and play ball have come to be used in everyday language.

Brainstorm a list of those terms and then ask students to use them in a non-baseball-related sentence. You might supplement their list with some of the expressions from Wikipedia's English-Language Idioms Derived from Baseball. Science -- find out about physics. Then encourage students to explore the entire site to learn about some other historical and scientific aspects of baseball. History -- create a timeline. Then invite students to research other team sports, such as basketball, football, and soccer, to learn when each of those sports was integrated.

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