book report idea for elementary

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Year after year, we review dozens of reader nominations, revisit sites from past lists, consider staff favorites, and search the far-flung corners of the web for new celebration of new year essay for a varied compilation that will prove an asset to any writer, of any genre, at any experience level. This selection represents this year's creativity-centric websites for writers. These websites fuel out-of-the-box thinking and help writers awaken their choke palahnuik and literary analysis. Be sure to check out the archives for references to innovative techniques and processes from famous thinkers like Einstein and Darwin. The countless prompts, how-tos on guided imagery and creative habits, mixed-media masterpieces, and more at Creativity Portal have sparked imaginations for more than 18 years. Boost your literary credentials by submitting your best caption for the stand-alone cartoon to this weekly choke palahnuik and literary analysis from The New Yorker. The top three captions advance to a public vote, and the winners will be included in a future issue of the magazine.

Book report idea for elementary rfid thesis abstracts

Book report idea for elementary

In addition, being able to follow the organization and sequencing of a story, as well as identify its point of view and draw inferences from its content, is crucial for the entirety of their educational careers. And of course, reading books is where they get that practice. Book reports are a classic part of the elementary school experience.

By asking your students to think about different elements of a story—looking for constructive details—and by having them share their interpretation of a book, they learn to read more deeply, explore beyond their own lives and appreciate literature for all the riches it contains.

But what fun is it to simply fill out those traditional book report worksheets? First, students need to know what constitutes a story. Then, have them select a book from a pre-approved list for the book report project and ask them to explain why they chose that book. Choose from any of these creative book report project ideas below to get your third graders engaged and excited to explore the wide world of literature and language arts.

Creating a classbook is a fun, engaging and collaborative project that your students can really take pride in. Use any of the following three ideas to have your students create their own individual pages based on the books they read:. Do a Mini Report Using one piece of paper, have your students summarize the story, identifying the main characters, setting, problem and solution of the book.

They can add drawings to illustrate their favorite scenes or symbols from the story. Write a Poem Have your students create a poem that highlights the main theme of the book, including details about the main characters, setting, conflict and resolution. Create a Portrait of a Character from the Book Have your students draw a portrait of their favorite character from the book, being as detailed as possible.

Once all of your students have created their mini report, poem or portrait, you can combine these to put into your classbook. This will help them remember and learn from not only their own stories, but the books their fellow students read as well. Have your students dress up as their favorite character from the book they read. They can each take turns telling the story from the first-person perspective of the character they have chosen.

Letting them read, act out a scene or even field questions as their favorite character, can prove a fun exercise for the whole class. Let your students create a fun, wearable book report with the help of a plain white T-shirt and some fabric markers or paint.

Have them sketch out their report on regular, letter-sized paper before they move onto the T-shirt material. Drawn elements should include the main characters, the setting of the story, any symbols and a summary of the plot that students can show and share with their classmates.

All that students need is a hanger, some string or yarn, some paper, a hole punch and markers. On a paper across the body of the hanger, students can identify their book. Then they can cut small cards out and draw or write different elements of the story like characters and story details to hang from the hanger with string. Students can use an old pizza box or make one from cardboard for this project. On the lid of the box, they can identify the book, main characters, setting and plot, and then have each slice of the pizza pie tell a part of the story from beginning to end.

Using cards cut to fit inside a mint tin, have your students create a mint tin book report. Use the back of the cereal box to create a game or activity related to the book. First, have your students write a summary of the book they read. Next, they can decorate a paper bag from the grocery store with scenes from the story. Then, have them place five items representing something from the book inside the bag.

Finally, each student presents their bag to the class, explaining their illustrations and how each of the items relates to the book they read. Students can use several pieces of paper taped together end to end to create a timeline for their book. Then they can use writing and drawing to highlight characters, topics and other story details along the timeline, creating a visual sequence of events to summarize what happened in the book. Using construction paper or cardstock along with a hole punch, yarn or string and markers, have your students create several bookmarks that represent their favorite characters or scenes from the book.

This imaginative project allows your students to pretend their book is going to be made into a blockbuster movie. First, have your students sketch their poster ideas on regular, letter-sized paper. Next, have them recreate their sketches on a large piece of poster or chart paper. Main characters, setting details and plot should all be represented on the poster.

This project can also easily be turned into a published classbook. All you need to do is order your FREE Classbook Publishing Kit , have your students create their posters using markers and then write a couple of paragraphs summarizing what they read! Start this creative project by showing your students examples of stellar book jackets, pointing out the front cover with its title and illustration, the spine and that information and the back cover with the summary of the book.

You may even want to have them fold the ends of the paper in for flaps on which they can provide more information about the book or the story. Then have them design an all-new jacket for the book they read. First, have your students draw a small portrait or photograph-like picture of the main character of their book. This should be cut out and pasted into the center of a larger piece of poster or chart paper.

This is a super simple idea that is quite fun for students. Provide each student with a lunch-sized paper bag. Tell them to think about 5 objects that relate to the main character of their book. The objects have to be small enough to fit into the bag. Send the bags home and have students place the 5 objects in the bag and bring them back to school. On the day they are due, have students take turns sharing the objects in their bags and explaining how they relate to the main character of the book.

You can even make a great display with the bags, objects, and books to pique the interest of other students. Have students dress up as the main character of their book. Making a lap book is easy and it is a great way to display and present information in a creative way. All you need are two file folders, some cardstock or construction paper, scissors, glue, and the FREE book report template found here.

The finished products are quite amazing, and your students will probably keep theirs forever! Check out my photo tutorial for making a lap book. Have students construct a diorama of one of the main events of their book. They will make a 3-dimensional scene, including models of characters, the setting, and objects. A shoebox makes a great place to build a diorama. Require students to write a description of the scene. This might be the easiest option of the book report ideas.

Have students first sketch their posters on a sheet of notebook paper. Then, provide students with a large piece of poster paper or chart paper. Posters must identify main characters, setting, title, problem, and solution. Display finished posters on classroom or hallway walls. Have students write the title of the book on this paper plate semi circle and hang the mobile pieces from it.

Provide students with construction paper, yarn, markers, paper hole punches, and any other materials they might need. With just one piece of paper, your students can make a complete book report. In these projects , students identify the main character, setting, problem, and solution of a book. No tape, glue, or staples required! Show your students several examples of some outstanding book jackets.

Point out the front with the title and illustration, the spine and its information, and the back with the book summary. Also show the 2 inside flaps with information about the author and a smaller summary. Provide them each with a larger piece of paper and have them design a jacket for the book they have just read. It would be ideal to assign this project at the beginning of the book, and have students write a diary entry for the events of each chapter of the book.

Regardless of which of these book report ideas you choose, be sure to clearly outline the expectations before your students begin. Keep it fun and engaging, and your students will be excited to invest their time in their projects! We respect your privacy.

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Do your kids roll their eyes at the thought of having to write another boring book report?

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Custom homework ghostwriting sites for masters Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. This resource contains all the instructions and handouts needed to complete the lapbook shown in the picture Setting Where is the story set, and why is it important? Make trading cards like baseball cards for a few characters from the book. What about the other book characters?
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Book report idea for elementary First, have your students draw a small portrait or photograph-like picture of the main character of their book. All Posts. Then have them design an all-new jacket for the book they read. What clubs would they be in or lead? Notify me via e-mail if anyone answers my comment.
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Book report idea for elementary Write a Poem Have your students create a poem that highlights the main theme of the book, including details about the main characters, setting, conflict and resolution. Write a different ending for the book. PreK—K, 1—2, 3—5, 6—8. Provide them each with a larger piece of paper and have them design a jacket for the book they have just read. Create a greeting card to go along with your gift. Easy to make, these customized and flexible projects will motivate your students to book report idea for elementary, think and write. Do you love history?
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Sell It. Each student pretends to be a publicist for the book that's just been read. The student writes and then delivers a second speech that will persuade other students that they should read the book. Writing and speaking persuasively will be especially difficult if the student didn't like the book. If that's the case, the student can share that fact after completing the speech. Create a Card Catalog. After reading a book, a student completes an index card with information about the book.

The front of the card includes details such as title, author, and date published along with a two- to three-sentence synopsis of the book. On the back of the card, the student writes a paragraph critiquing the book. Students might even rate the book using a teacher-created five-star rating system. Example: A five-star book is "highly recommended; a book you can't put down. Interview a Character.

Each student composes six to eight questions to ask a main character in a book just completed. The student also writes the character's response to each question. The questions and answers should provide information that shows the student read the book without giving away the most significant details.

Ten Facts. Each student creates a "Ten Facts About [book title]" sheet that lists ten facts he or she learned from reading the book. The facts, written in complete sentences, must include details the student didn't know before reading the book. Script It! Each student writes a movie script for a favorite scene in a book just read.

At the top of the script, the student can assign real-life TV or movie stars to play each role. The student might also work with classmates to perform the favorite scene. Each student will need 30 index cards to create a Concentration-style game related to a book just finished. The student chooses 14 things, characters, or events that played a part in the book and creates two cards that have identical pictures of each of those things. The two remaining cards are marked Wild Card! Then the student turns all 30 cards facedown and mixes them up.

Each student can choose a partner with whom to play according to the rules of Concentration. What Did You Learn? Each student writes a summary of what he or she learned from a book just completed. The summary might include factual information, something learned about people in general, or something the student learned about himself or herself. Glossary and Word Search. Each student creates a glossary of ten or more words that are specific to a book's tone, setting, or characters. The student defines each word and writes a sentence from the book that includes that word.

Then the student creates a word search puzzle that includes the glossary words. Students can exchange their glossaries and word searches with others in the class. In the News. Each student creates the front page of a newspaper that tells about events and characters in a book just read. The newspaper page might include weather reports, an editorial or editorial cartoon, ads, etc. The title of the newspaper should be something appropriate to the book.

Create a Comic Book. Each student can turn a book, or part of it, into a comic book, complete with comic-style illustrations and dialogue bubbles. Characters Come to Life. Each student creates life-size "portraits" of one of the characters from a book just read. The portrait should include a written piece that tells about the character. The piece might also include information about events, traits, or conflicts in the book that involve that character.

Hang the students' portraits in a class gallery. Prove It in Five Minutes. Each student gives a second 2-minute oral presentation in which he or she shares information about a book's plot and characters. The student closes the presentation by offering an opinion and recommendation about the book.

Then students in the audience have seconds to question the presenter about the book. If the presenter is able to prove in five minutes that he or she read the book, the student is excused from filing a written report about it. Picture Books. After reading a book, each student creates a picture book version of the story that would appeal to younger students. The students can then share the picture books with a group of young students.

Resume Writing. As a tie-in to your career education program, challenge each student to create a resume for a book character. The student should include in the resume a statement of the applicant's goals and a detailed account of his or her experience and outside interests. Character Trait Chart. Each student creates a chart with three columns. Each column is headed with the name of one of the book's characters. As the student reads the book, he or she can keep a record of the traits each character possesses and include an incident that supports each trait.

Theme Report. Challenge each student to select a concept or a thing from the book just finished and to use library or Internet resources to explore it further. The student then writes a two-page report that shares information about the topic. To learn more about the setting of a book, each student writes a one-page report explaining how that setting was important to the story.

The entries should share details about the story that will prove the student read the book. You can find curated collections of high-interest fiction and non-fiction texts at Steps to Literacy. Steps to Literacy offers inclusive and differentiated collections of age and developmentally appropriate books and resources that engage students and foster a love for reading within each of them.

Learn more about building your own customized classroom library. Leave this field blank. Search Search. Newsletter Sign Up. Search form Search. Make A Book Report Sandwich! Her idea: book report sandwiches! On the top slice of bread, each student wrote the title and the author of the book the student had just finished reading. On the lettuce, the student wrote a brief summary of the book.

The student wrote about the main character on the tomato slice. On the mayonnaise, the student described the book's setting. The student shared the book's climax on the Swiss cheese. On the ham slice, the student described the plot. On the bottom piece of bread, the student drew a favorite scene from the story. They were instructed to include the following: Questions Write ten questions based on the book. Five of the questions can be about general content, but the other five must require more thinking.

Vocabulary Create a ten-word glossary of unfamiliar words from the book. Things Include five things that have a connection to the story. The ideas appeal to many different learning styles. Many of the ideas involve making choices, organizing information -- and writing!

Most of the ideas will provide teachers with a clear idea about whether students actually read the book. And all the ideas will engage students, help make books come alive for them, and challenge them to think in different ways about the books they read! Trending Report Card Comments It's report card time and you face the prospect of writing constructive, insightful, and original comments on a couple dozen report cards or more. Here are positive report card comments for you to use and adapt!

Struggling Students? You've reached the end of another grading period, and what could be more daunting than the task of composing insightful, original, and unique comments about every child in your class? The following positive statements will help you tailor your comments to specific children and highlight their strengths.

You can also use our statements to indicate a need for improvement. Turn the words around a bit, and you will transform each into a goal for a child to work toward. Sam cooperates consistently with others becomes Sam needs to cooperate more consistently with others, and Sally uses vivid language in writing may instead read With practice, Sally will learn to use vivid language in her writing.

Make Jan seeks new challenges into a request for parental support by changing it to read Please encourage Jan to seek new challenges. Whether you are tweaking statements from this page or creating original ones, check out our Report Card Thesaurus [see bottom of the page] that contains a list of appropriate adjectives and adverbs.

There you will find the right words to keep your comments fresh and accurate. We have organized our report card comments by category. Read the entire list or click one of the category links below to jump to that list. Behavior The student: cooperates consistently with the teacher and other students. Character The student: shows respect for teachers and peers.

Group Work The student: offers constructive suggestions to peers to enhance their work. Interests and Talents The student: has a well-developed sense of humor. Participation The student: listens attentively to the responses of others. Social Skills The student: makes friends quickly in the classroom. Time Management The student: tackles classroom assignments, tasks, and group work in an organized manner. Work Habits The student: is a conscientious, hard-working student.

Student Certificates! Recognize positive attitudes and achievements with personalized student award certificates! Report Card Thesaurus Looking for some great adverbs and adjectives to bring to life the comments that you put on report cards? Go beyond the stale and repetitive With this list, your notes will always be creative and unique. Adjectives attentive, capable, careful, cheerful, confident, cooperative, courteous, creative, dynamic, eager, energetic, generous, hard-working, helpful, honest, imaginative, independent, industrious, motivated, organized, outgoing, pleasant, polite, resourceful, sincere, unique Adverbs always, commonly, consistently, daily, frequently, monthly, never, occasionally, often, rarely, regularly, typically, usually, weekly.

Included: A stadium full of activities and links to team sites, baseball math sites, cross-curricular projects -- and even the famous Abbott and Costello "Who's On First? For students, the welcome warmth of the spring sun, the tantalizing sight of green grass and manicured base lines, the far off sound of a bat meeting a ball, the imagined scent of popcorn and hotdogs, can be powerful distracters. Desperate measures are called for!

Bring the game into the classroom -- and score a home run -- with this week's Education World lessons and activities. Although most are designed for students in grades 5 and above, many can be adapted for younger students as well. Discuss how sports affect the lives of fans as well as players. Ask students to tell about an occasion when sports positively or negatively affected their own lives. Tell them to think about 5 objects that relate to the main character of their book. The objects have to be small enough to fit into the bag.

Send the bags home and have students place the 5 objects in the bag and bring them back to school. On the day they are due, have students take turns sharing the objects in their bags and explaining how they relate to the main character of the book. You can even make a great display with the bags, objects, and books to pique the interest of other students.

Have students dress up as the main character of their book. Making a lap book is easy and it is a great way to display and present information in a creative way. All you need are two file folders, some cardstock or construction paper, scissors, glue, and the FREE book report template found here.

The finished products are quite amazing, and your students will probably keep theirs forever! Check out my photo tutorial for making a lap book. Have students construct a diorama of one of the main events of their book. They will make a 3-dimensional scene, including models of characters, the setting, and objects. A shoebox makes a great place to build a diorama. Require students to write a description of the scene. This might be the easiest option of the book report ideas.

Have students first sketch their posters on a sheet of notebook paper. Then, provide students with a large piece of poster paper or chart paper. Posters must identify main characters, setting, title, problem, and solution. Display finished posters on classroom or hallway walls. Have students write the title of the book on this paper plate semi circle and hang the mobile pieces from it. Provide students with construction paper, yarn, markers, paper hole punches, and any other materials they might need.

With just one piece of paper, your students can make a complete book report. In these projects , students identify the main character, setting, problem, and solution of a book. No tape, glue, or staples required! Show your students several examples of some outstanding book jackets. Point out the front with the title and illustration, the spine and its information, and the back with the book summary.

Also show the 2 inside flaps with information about the author and a smaller summary. Provide them each with a larger piece of paper and have them design a jacket for the book they have just read. It would be ideal to assign this project at the beginning of the book, and have students write a diary entry for the events of each chapter of the book.

Regardless of which of these book report ideas you choose, be sure to clearly outline the expectations before your students begin. Keep it fun and engaging, and your students will be excited to invest their time in their projects! We respect your privacy. You can unsubscribe at any time. View our privacy policy here. You've successfully signed up!

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See the sandwich and pizza options below and check out this blog for more delicious ideas. Have students locate current event articles a character in their book might be interested in. Learning about how current events affect time, place, and people is critical to helping develop opinions about what we read and experience in life.

In this project, each layer of this book report sandwich covers a different element of the book—characters, setting, conflict, etc. A fun adaptation to this project is the book report cheeseburger. Choose alphabet books to help give your students examples of how they work around themes. Then ask your students to create their own Book Alphabet based on the book they read.

What artifacts, vocabulary words, and names reflect the important parts of the book? After they find a word to represent each letter, have them write one sentence that explains where the word fits in. Then they draw a head and arms on card stock and attach them to the board from behind to make it look like the main character is peeking over the report.

For your visual learner students, they can work on some of these cool lessons and projects to further understand a book where the setting is critical think Orphan Island by Laurel Snyder. Another fun and creative idea: create a wearable book report with a plain white tee. Create a new book jacket for your story. Include an attractive illustrated cover, a summary, a short biography of the author, and a few reviews from readers. This is great for biography research projects.

Students cut out a photocopied image of their subject and glue it in the middle. Then, they draw lines from the image to the edges of the paper, like rays of sunshine, and fill in each section with information about the person. As a book report template, the center image could be a copy of the book cover, and each section expands on key information such as character names, theme s , conflict, resolution, etc.

Dress up as your favorite character from the book and present an oral book report. If your favorite character is not the main character, retell the story from their point of view. Another idea that works well for both nonfiction and fiction book reports.

Each wedge of the pizza pie tells part of the story. Create a custom illustrated bookmark including drawings and words from either your favorite chapter or the entire book. This project really encourages creative thinking. Students read a book and write a summary. Then, they decorate a paper grocery bag with a scene from the book, place five items that represent something from the book inside the bag, and present the bag to the class! Ask your students to think about a character in their book.

What kinds of books might that character like to read? Take them to the library to choose five books the character might have on their to-be-read list. Have them list the books and explain what each book might mean to the character.

Also called a lap book, this easy-to-make book report hits on all the major elements of a book study and gives students a chance to show what they know in a colorful way. Create a collage using pictures and words that represent different parts of the book. Use old magazines or print pictures from the internet.

This image shows a 3-D model, but the link provides a lesson to show students how to glue four triangles together to make a 4-D model. Create a timeline of the main events from your book. Be sure to include character names and details for each event. Use 8 x 11 sheets of paper taped together or a long portion of bulletin board paper. Students just need an ordinary clothes hanger, strings, and paper.

The body of the hanger is used to identify the book, and the cards on the strings dangling below are filled with key elements of the book, like characters, setting, and a summary. If a student has read a book about a cause that affects people, animals, or the environment, teach them about Public Service Announcements. Once they understand what a PSA is, have them research the issue or cause that stood out in the book.

Then give them a template for a storyboard so they can create their own PSA. Some students might want to take it a step further and create a video based on their storyboard. Students have 9 types of mini reports to choose from to complete and add to their pop- up report organize Amazing non-fiction and fiction book report templates for upper grade!

Instead of using lower-level traditional book reports where the students simply input "story maps", these book reports can be used with any reading program such as AR or Scholastic Reader and incorporate common core standards l Book Report Project Rubric. I could change this to fit upper article article reviews I need to play with this. Meet the newest member of the Outside the Box Project family!

It is hands on and engaging. My students presented their Paper Bag Character assignments today. LOVED it!!! They worked so hard on these projects, and it definitely paid off. Their final projects were awesome! When the students finished presenting their 10 items inside the bag, we set all the projects up in the nutrition area outside my classroom, and had a gallery walk-through.

This is the first time I've done the gallery walk-through with these projects Next year I'd like to invite a few…. This uniquely shaped cheeseburger book report project contains assembling directions, first draft worksheets, final draft templates, grading rubric, and a matching bulletin board banner.

Banish boring book reports! This fun lapbook resource will create a book report project for ANY novel - use for independent reading projects, literature circles, or whole class novel studies. This resource contains all the instructions and handouts needed to complete the lapbook shown in the picture