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Year after year, we review dozens of reader nominations, revisit sites from past lists, consider staff favorites, and search the far-flung corners of the web for new celebration of new year essay for a varied compilation that will prove an asset to any writer, of any genre, at any experience level. This selection represents this year's creativity-centric websites for writers. These websites fuel out-of-the-box thinking and help writers awaken their choke palahnuik and literary analysis. Be sure to check out the archives for references to innovative techniques and processes from famous thinkers like Einstein and Darwin. The countless prompts, how-tos on guided imagery and creative habits, mixed-media masterpieces, and more at Creativity Portal have sparked imaginations for more than 18 years. Boost your literary credentials by submitting your best caption for the stand-alone cartoon to this weekly choke palahnuik and literary analysis from The New Yorker. The top three captions advance to a public vote, and the winners will be included in a future issue of the magazine.

Help with my culture dissertation abstract extended essay word count references

Help with my culture dissertation abstract

Ultimately the project seeks to make the familiar strange, offering a theory of the digital image that refuses a genealogy of the visible. Whereas many studies of the art market have focused on market participants and technologies, this study has taken as its object the ways in which popular portrayals of art market - the understandings they disclose - index the development of the neoliberal "regime of truth. Surveying board games, reality television, investment manuals, graduate education, and legal battles, the dissertation charts a wide array of attempts to inscribe or prescribe neoliberal rationality - its reducation of the social to competition, of knowledge to action-oriented calculation, and of being to invested human capital - in the art market and, importantly, their failures.

In theorizing those failures, the dissertation seeks to illuminate the very limits of neoliberal rationality and its concomitant subject formation and, thus, point toward potential for resistance and advance the rethinking both our governing forms of reason but the subject itself. This dissertation considers how advances in the surveillance of cell phone data, decentralized mobile networks, and vocal affective monitoring software are changing the ways in which listening exerts power and frames social and political possibilities.

The low- and middle-level design limitations and broad implementations of these communication media frame cultural circumstances in terms of what kinds of emotional expressions and social relations are both perceptible and acceptable. The first chapter looks at recent and contemporary software that seeks to identify emotions in the acoustic voice by ignoring words and instead measuring quantifiable parameters of sound. The design of these algorithms shows a change in their conception of the human emotional system as they evolve from truth-telling to predictive machines.

The second chapter traces the development and global dissemination of cell phone surveillance programs. It concludes that these social movements experimented with autonomous zones of horizontal connectivity, but failed to sustain themselves in part because of a lack of resilient communications infrastructures to mirror and facilitate their politics.

The fourth chapter is a whitepaper outlining the requirements elicitation for the amidst project, an ad-hoc peer-to- peer decentralized network for mobile devices, which is a collaboration between the author and three engineers. This project proposes a remedy to the critiques of surveillance, blocking, and infrastructural weakness elucidated throughout previous chapters. This dissertation explores localism through a variety of lenses.

It primarily examines Brooklyn's local, artisanal food movement and the branding of Brooklyn, and also looks at early localist tendencies in the borough as well as the early food movement in California. It positions the localism movement as a cultural response to globalization and the post-industrialism. This project is not only about food and branding but about how nostalgia for the late nineteenth or early twentieth century becomes the primary form of these post-industrial practices.

Once a major port and industrial sector and renown for its village-like ethnic neighborhoods, Brooklyn has responded to an economic imperative and transitioned into a post-industrial economy. Its population and neighborhoods have dynamically transformed, largely due to immigrants and rising real estate prices.

While the borough's economy is no longer based on a producerist model, there has been a ground-swell of efforts to reverse the trend of globalization by creating small-scale, "local" food networks and to "return" to a kind of pre-industrial mode of food production, whether in practice or in aesthetics.

In Brooklyn, part of one of the most cosmopolitan cities of the world, the local food movement has emerged in tandem with an ethos and aesthetic of craftwork, in part, as a response to shift from manufacturing and manual labor to a service economy where much work is considered "immaterial.

It traces the rise of conscious locavore practices nationally, internationally, and in Brooklyn. It interrogates the politics of the local food movement, through discourses and practices of localism and of craftwork within the milieu what has been called "New Brooklyn Cuisine," a subgenre of American Cuisine that has a particular century-old, rustic aesthetic. Finally, this dissertation analyzes Brooklyn's turn to branding and destination marketing to be economically competitive in the global economy, efforts which are equally steeped in nostalgia for a Brooklyn of yore.

What is at stake here, in each case, is the question of urban authenticity. This dissertation is about how mainstream U. These three developments, I argue, were pivotal in re-shaping the public sphere from one where relatively few voices and viewpoints prevailed, to one where a greater diversity of voices and viewpoints are considered legitimate, thereby increasing the instances in which no one narrative becomes widely accepted as "truth;" or, stated differently, decreasing the salience of issues or ideas on which a broad majority of Americans are in agreement.

This dissertation finds that mainstream news, with its mandate of objectivity, has increasingly imposed its own logic on a socio-political world with multiple, often conflicting, voices, while at the same time working to defend against successful challenges to the very institutions on which its own legitimacy rests. As such it highlights the historical contingency of the practice of journalistic objectivity - how it is indelibly marked by its formation in the crucible of the liberal-centrist twentieth century - and shows how "objective" news has adapted to the epistemological challenges posed by a pluralist and partisan political sphere.

Global demand for the planet's best sushi has fueled the environmentalists' concern that the prized bluefin--what industry insiders call "red gold"--is on the brink of extinction. At the same time, nation states have agreed to protect it and other animals on the high seas through the policies adopted by the treaty body known as the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas ICCAT.

Because marine life has plummeted under ICCAT's watch since its inception some four decades ago, this dissertation asks: what is ICCAT achieving, if not its advertised purpose to conserve sea creatures? This ethnographic study illuminates environmental diplomacy in action, and takes the supply of the high-profile Atlantic bluefin tuna as material to explain how the oceans are governed, by whom, for whom and according to what values and logics.

Based on time-series data collected over three years, it shows in situ that ICCAT is entangled in a larger universe of international lawmaking, economic development, statecraft, civil society and fisheries science--all to master very mobile things of nature.

The dissertation advances three primary findings. First, red gold and ICCAT co-produced one another, and did so under pressure from the environmentalists and from encroaching international legal instruments. In the game of marine conservation, delegates worry about the net total of the export quota.

Yet in the game of economic development, member states seek to grow their share of the pie. Conservation is calibrated to supplying the market for economic growth, not to creating an ocean full of fish. Third, as delegates aspire to control the supply of red gold, ICCAT proclaims its empire too: today member states assert their sovereignty by demonstrating their good standing in supra-national regulatory regimes, even when a meeting's outcome does not satisfy their interests.

Research in urban and environmental studies consistently shows the devastating impacts of forced relocation; however, climate change is now rendering some places increasingly vulnerable — even uninhabitable.

What are the social, political, and cultural consequences of these changes? How do individuals and communities mediate bodies of knowledge about climate change, risk, and vulnerability in ways that are in tension with government policies meant to alleviate those risks? Who decides when it is time to retreat, and how does this form of collective movement reshape the urban landscape and everyday life? While managed retreat is conventionally understood as a top-down process, this dissertation charts the rise of communities organizing from the bottom-up to enlist government support to move.

It draws on fieldwork over four years in the New York City borough of Staten Island, where residents mobilized in favor of retreat after Hurricane Sandy, lobbying the government to buy out their damaged houses and return their neighborhoods to wetlands rather than rebuilding. Examining the paradoxical process of a community organizing to disperse itself, the dissertation argues that retreat is not the direct result of individual decisions or objective measures of imminent danger but rather is mediated by social and cultural dynamics, government policies, and contested technologies of representing risk.

Understanding the lived experience of retreat on Staten Island, where moving away from the waterfront came to mean, for many, an empowering act of personal sacrifice for the greater good, but was ultimately only possible for a select few, lends insight into the complexities of responding to climate change in ways that are both environmentally sustainable and socially just.

This dissertation explores how heritage experiences are made and managed through sound in one of the most sacred, contested, and popular tourist regions in the United States. Tourism is big business in South Dakota, and like elsewhere in the American West, it relies upon producing experiences that draw heavily from frontier histories and mythologies.

Based on a production-centered sound ethnography conducted over four summers and drawing on the approaches of sound studies, media and affect theory, and historical and cultural analysis, this dissertation argues that the aural modes used to produce frontier experience in the region are the most crucial and under theorized aspects of tourist production. The dissertation traces frontier and tourist myths to a shared belief in the material emplacement of future transformation, arguing that tourism is an extractive industry built upon the methods and infrastructures of earlier resource-based industries.

It outlines a conceptual frame for understanding how sound, noise, and silence are used to produce frontier experience and showing how aural relations between silent nature, noisy technology, and sounded culture are naturalized. It investigates the forms of hearing, listening, and sound making that work to solidify the region as an experiential artifact of the originary conquest of the American West. Finally, it explores how regional Lakota and non-Lakota producers negotiate frontier aural productions and politics.

Ultimately, this dissertation articulates how audibility is constructed along racial lines as a form of heritage. Through the aural stances enacted at tourist venues in the Black Hills, Lakota peoples and lands are consistently exploited and colonized. They are protected as valuable, spiritual silences and made inaudible by the noise and sound of technological processes. These processes, in turn, shape non-natives as active participants in sounded culture.

This dissertation thus argues that frontier aural productions have profound consequences for the future cultural, political, and economic sovereignty of Lakota peoples. In the last forty to fifty years, stand-up comedy has emerged as a site where anxieties about health, illness, death, and dying are negotiated. Part of a proliferation of health discourses beyond clinical spaces and encounters between physicians and patients, stand-up comedy and stand-up comedians participate in the construction of new publics and practices that reflect changes in how health, responsibility, and health risk are acted on at the intersection of biomedicine and culture.

Stand-up comedy is at once deployed to communicate the moral imperative of and resistance to idealized notions of responsible patienthood in the present-day United States. Drawing on biomedicalization theory, this dissertation examines how the emergence of stand-up comedy in our health discourse reflects critical changes to how we talk about illness and loss, and how we understand health as a personal, moral responsibility. Employing discourse analysis and an ethnography that includes participant-observation and semi-structured interviews, I examine how and why stand-up comedy emerged as an important site of inquiry for the cultural study of health.

Stand-up comedy has long functioned as a bastion for the transgression of cultural taboos. I am interested in what the emergence of stand-up comedy in our health discourse uncovers about how we talk about illness experiences, and how that is changing. I argue that these emergent practices reveal a profound discomfort in addressing the lived experiences of illness, death, and dying in frank terms.

Located at the intersection of science and technology studies STS and the cultural study of health, my dissertation explores the cleavages between these efforts, and considers what the utilization of stand-up comedy on both sides of this divide reveals about how we understand health and the experience of illness in the twenty-first century. Recent years have seen a significant revival of interest in Aristotle's hylomorphic philosophy among intellectual historians and philosophers working in both the analytic and continental traditions.

This dissertation applies the diverse conceptual outgrowths of these contemporary engagements with Aristotelian thought to the study of media and mediation. This objective is pursued in three distinct but related ways. In its first three chapters, which are primarily theoretical in nature, the project develops a hylomorphic metaphysical system that centers upon the motif of mediation.

In its fourth and fifth chapter, which are focused on empirical content, it applies this system to the analysis of multi-modal texts and products of the current media landscape. Throughout both of these broad sections, the project also develops and demonstrates a uniquely critical approach to hylomorphic thought, one which fuses modified Aristotelian concepts with post-Marxist approaches to cultural studies.

Taken together, Chapters incorporate a number of influences from Aristotle and other, more contemporary thinkers into its metaphysical system. Chapter 4 then carries out the first empirical application of the project's metaphysical system through an analysis of the contemporary media phenomenon known as "Game of Thrones.

While building on the empirical demonstrations of Chapter 4, Chapter 5 focusses more extensively on the critical applications of the project's metaphysical scheme. Applying the method developed in the previous chapter to the famous real-time strategy videogame entitled StarCraft, this chapter analyzes the manner in which the game mediates specific elements of Cold War-era defense ideation and military-industrial economics.

The conclusion then summarizes the arguments and findings, and proposes further applications. This dissertation examines how computational interaction design has been influenced by theories of emotion drawn from the psychological sciences, and argues that the contemporary field of interaction design would be impossible without the developments in psychology that allowed human emotions to be understood as orderable and classifiable.

Interaction design, or the process by which digital media are created and modified for human use, has grappled with theories of human emotion since its inception in the early s. The project examines how the longer histories of psychology and psychiatry have changed conceptualizations of emotion in relation to cognition and behavior, and how shifts in these theories have shaped the development of a burgeoning array of digital tools for tracking and managing human emotions.

Examining the continuum of humans and machines desired and configured by individuals throughout this history, the project explores how these subject identities, both imagined and made, have reflected broader changes in the exercise of social power and authority. The research draws on materials from several archives, including newspaper reports; the published works and archival materials of psychologists and computer science researchers; materials from the West Coast Computer Faire tradeshow in the late s; interviews with designers; and psychological texts and textbooks.

Alongside a design assessment of smartphone apps for mood tracking grounded in Values in Design VID scholarship, the project deploys historical, philosophical, and qualitative methods, including close reading and discursive and thematic analysis. The key mechanism for understanding emotion's role in digital media design is the drive to make human feelings both technically ordinal and scalable. Through these conceptual mechanisms, human feelings have become increasingly classifiable not only horizontally as different categorical types, but also hierarchically in ways that differentiate and assign value to the emotions and moods of individuals in relation to a larger mass of data.

Accomplished through both natural and symbolic language, these mechanisms combine qualitative and quantitative modes of classification, enabling sociotechnical phenomena ranging from personal applications for digital mood tracking to the analysis of emotional "Big Data" by social media platforms. This dissertation is an ethnographic study of the socio-political and economic contexts, ideologies, and activism of documentary filmmaking in post Nehruvian India.

Focusing on documentary filmmakers' rejection of state-sponsored documentary canons, their critiques of state, cultural, and economic institutions, and their battles against censorship, this ethnography links documentary's legacy of political activism to the far-reaching social and political transformations of post-liberalization India.

In doing so, it asks: in what ways does the social world of documentary film open up new possibilities for political engagement and social transformation? And, how do documentary filmmakers reimagine and reinterpret discourses about the national public sphere and citizenship in India in a time of "globalization? The dissertation engages documentary filmmakers' battles against censorship amidst the vast expansion of documentary film festivals and screening spaces in the early twenty first century.

Focusing on the Campaign against Censorship, in which filmmakers directly confronted the state over the censorship of their films, it explores the ways in which the "censorship debates" among filmmakers foregrounded questions of activist ideologies, form, and the aesthetics of political filmmaking.

These questions were inextricably linked with histories in which documentary filmmaking has been deployed within "nation-building" projects and as activist tools in social movements in postcolonial India. I show how this legacy continues to define documentary film, even as filmmakers attempt to rearticulate and question these histories in the context of shifts in markets, audiences, and technologies that redefined the terrain of political activism in post-liberalization India.

Even as collective action on censorship stalled amidst internal dissensions, these critical debates took vital, material form within the rapid proliferation of documentary film festivals in the country. The new festival spaces marked the emergence of "documentary publics," critical counterpublics that, I argue, represented a distinctly alternative political formation in the context of the forces of religious nationalism and globalizing consumerism that have defined India's post Nehruvian public sphere.

Converging through multiple, divergent screening histories, these publics embodied a social imagination based on ideals of collectivity, inclusiveness, and an abiding ethical commitment, and marked the unpredictable borders of political possibility in contemporary India. Cancer is no longer just one entity.

In fact, advances in genetic sciences reframe our understanding of the disease s and shape how cancers will be treated in the future. These new developments highlight the importance of the genetic make-up of each individual.

The quest is not to find a cure, but to devise personalized solutions. Based on a multi-sited ethnography, the dissertation describes the network amongst patients, scientists, institutions, and animals in the rush to find cures for cancers. It is concerned with understanding moments of mediation and mediatization of cancer research that identify cultural transformations around the understanding and representation of the disease.

This interdisciplinary dissertation first identifies the field of cancer studies historically. It then, explores the role of Jackson Laboratory and mice in the creation of a new imaginary of cancer. Next, it describes the rise of the field of personalized medicine, which needs mice to see, understand, and ultimately cure cancers. Created and trademarked at the Jackson Library in Bar Harbor, ME, avatar mice are engineered to host human tumors on their bodies.

My research describes these advances in cancer research and comments on theories of posthumanism, avatarity, virtuality, and actuality. Here animals are sold as media technologies and made part of scopic regimes. My exploration for for-profit mice sales, introduces the notion of bioaffect to make sense of the constant state of exception that such laboratory mice live under.

Overall this dissertation presents a platform by which questions about biopolitics, affect, animality and bioethics are posed and argues for the importance of a media studies approach to the study of cancer. Group Center organized art exhibitions, lectures and jazz shows and Black Mask produced an eponymous Dada-influenced broadside and participated widely in anti-war agitation.

These groups also persistently performed actions against the art world, including protests against the Museum of Modern Art, Lincoln Center, and even the New York School poets. This dissertation argues that such protests were aimed at the institutionalization of culture, but also at the very logic of representation. Situating Group Center and Black Mask's early aesthetic experimentalism as central to the formation of their anti-representationalism, the dissertation follows these groups' collaborations with the artist Aldo Tambellini on a series of "electromedia" performances that addressed the rise of Black Liberation within abstract form.

In addition, the dissertation traces the connections between these collectives and a broad range of art practices in which they were engaged, including televisual art, a nascent "expanded cinema" scene, Intermedia, art practices surrounding Judson Memorial Church, a radical theater scene surrounding the anarchist Living Theatre, early Minimalism and the Black Arts Movement. Alongside this cultural history, the dissertation follows these groups' relationships to the politics of numerous contemporaneous leftist groups including New York Anarchists, the Situationist International, Students for a Democratic Society, the Black Power movement and Radical Feminism.

While the groups that form the core of this study eventually rejected art practice in favor of "the real" of on-the-ground activism, I argue that the negotiations between politics and form entailed by their earlier aesthetic experimentalism were constitutive of the anti-representational politics they would later embody.

This project thus aims to open out this "minor history" to a broad range of influences in order to show how the extremity of these groups' anti-representational militancy was no mere aberration from the modernist project, but rather, an attempt to push the avant-gardist protest against the separation between art and life to its limits, and beyond. Over the past decade, video games have been commercially substantiated as a mass medium, addressing an increasingly broad audience.

With the sudden explosion of mobile platforms and social network games, hundreds of millions of users now play video games. Yet, it seems few industry developers pay heed to the impact video games have on the day-to-day lives of their players, as they continue to design games primarily for economic profit.

As both media and technology, however, video games are imbued with ethical, political, and social values expressed through the various components of the games themselves. In this dissertation, I seek to examine how these human values are expressed in video games by focusing on four layers of the video game: rules, fiction, platform, and kinesthetic.

By negotiating how each of these layers is expressive of human values, I explain how video games are capable of uniquely communicating ethics and politics through the intricacies of their complex design, including the more commonly analyzed sites of the visual, aural, and narrative, as well as rule sets, code, and input mechanisms. In my case studies on melodrama, proceduralized gender, and gunplay, I also examine some of values communicated by popular industry video games thus far, understanding what values and ideologies these seemingly frivolous media artifacts operate by and communicate in toto.

This dissertation examines several contemporary East Coast theater projects that, in pursuit of individual communitarian missions, self-consciously evoke "populist" cultural forms of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, namely vaudeville, Chautauqua, and American folk music. Through a series of case studies, I explore how contemporary cultural practices emerge from a precarious encounter between modernist aesthetics and various technical, social, and economic pressures, from the rise of digital recording and processing technologies to shifts in local real-estate markets to the changing priorities of funding agencies.

Combining ethnographic and archival research with practice-based research attained in the field of theatrical production as playwright performer and theatrical producer, I argue that these contemporary creative communities try, and ultimately fail, to overcome the contradictions of post-millennial cultural production through a return to traditional forms.

To the extent to which they do succeed, however, they do so by consciously looking past romantic and ideological notions of "community" to the material practices and social processes that constitute historical change. This work, then, contributes to account of American theater history attuned less to movements, canons, stars and spectacles than to the challenges of participatory action and the necessity of historical memory within the extended moment of American neoliberalism.

Breadcrumb Home Dissertation Abstracts. Bachelor of Science. Master of Arts. Doctor of Philosophy. Business of Entertainment, Media, and Technology. Data Mining: Ethics, Ethos, Episteme Solon Barocas This dissertation examines the novel challenges that data mining poses to privacy, fairness, and autonomy.

Fixing Identity: A Socio-Historical Analysis of State Practices of Identification Mediated Through Technologies of the Body Travis Hall This dissertation explores historical and social contexts through which governments employ technology to identify individuals through their bodies. Freud's Jaw and Other Lost Objects: Psychoanalysis and the Subjectivity of Survival Lana Lin This dissertation examines the psychic effects of cancer, in particular how cancer disrupts the security with which a body ordinarily feels coincident with the self.

Homework and the Bedroom-Study: Work, Leisure and Communication Technology Elizabeth Patton Home work and the Bedroom-Study: Work, Leisure and Communication Technology, investigates the myth of the bedroom as a space of sex and privacy and the disruption of the myth through the introduction of communication technology. Humanity's Publics: NGOs, Journalism, and the International Public Sphere Matthew Powers As legacy news outlets slash foreign news budgets, international NGOs have been discussed as sources of both promise and caution with respect to the future of foreign news - for journalists, for advocates and for citizens.

Hurricane Katrina: Visuality, Photography, and Representing a Crisis Song Chong This dissertation explores the ways in which the photography of Hurricane Katrina is informed by historical networks of representation and distribution through the strategies of visuality and countervisuality. Imagining the Art Market Paul Melton Whereas many studies of the art market have focused on market participants and technologies, this study has taken as its object the ways in which popular portrayals of art market - the understandings they disclose - index the development of the neoliberal "regime of truth.

Listening Intently: Towards a Critical Media Theory of Ethical Listening Jessica Feldman This dissertation considers how advances in the surveillance of cell phone data, decentralized mobile networks, and vocal affective monitoring software are changing the ways in which listening exerts power and frames social and political possibilities. Objectivity in an Age of Dissensus: Mainstream U. Sounding Western: Frontier Aurality, Tourism, and Heritage Production in South Dakota's Black Hills Jennifer Heuson This dissertation explores how heritage experiences are made and managed through sound in one of the most sacred, contested, and popular tourist regions in the United States.

Stand-Up Comedy in the Biomedicalization Era: Negotiating the Ideological Production of Health Beza Merid In the last forty to fifty years, stand-up comedy has emerged as a site where anxieties about health, illness, death, and dying are negotiated. Substance and Mediation: Towards a Critical Hylomorphic Metaphysics of Media Aaron Pedinotti Recent years have seen a significant revival of interest in Aristotle's hylomorphic philosophy among intellectual historians and philosophers working in both the analytic and continental traditions.

That Sognal Feeling: Emotion and Interaction Design from Smartphones to the "Anxious Seat" Charles Luke Stark This dissertation examines how computational interaction design has been influenced by theories of emotion drawn from the psychological sciences, and argues that the contemporary field of interaction design would be impossible without the developments in psychology that allowed human emotions to be understood as orderable and classifiable.

The Documentary Debates: Censorship, Protest, and Film Festival Publics in Contemporary India Tilottama Karlekar This dissertation is an ethnographic study of the socio-political and economic contexts, ideologies, and activism of documentary filmmaking in post Nehruvian India.

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Film Studies allows you to develop a greater understanding of film production and how film relates to culture and history. This dissertation is grounded in a cultural studies approach to representation as constitutive and constraining and a positional approach to gender that views gender identity as a position taken in a specific social context.

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For your one last task, you have to write do my film studies dissertation abstract a dissertation. The multivolume print set Dissertation Abstracts International provided some coverage, and some specialized journals would also publish the titles and abstracts of new dissertations in particular fields, but neither method could be said to be comprehensive. How to Write a First Class Dissertation. Writing a quality dissertation research topic and abstract writing can be difficult for many students who usually seek help Conceptual framework chapter in thesis and in the dissertation creativity is probably caused by the success of such resources is film studies.

The example dissertation titles below were written by our expert writers, as a learning aid to help you with your studies. The desire to study the film in depth through a case study into its fandom came from my own curiosity and ambition to decipher and understand the level of fandom that surrounds the film, and how.

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The managing daughter is a problem not accounted for in any conventional domestic structure or ideology so there is no role, no clear set of responsibilities and no boundaries that could, and arguably should, define her obligations, offer her opportunities for empowerment, or set necessary limits on the broad cultural mandate she has to comfort and care others.

The extremes she is often pushed to reveals the stresses and hidden conflicts for authority and autonomy inherent in domestic labor without the iconic angel in the house rhetoric that so often masks the difficulties of domestic life for women. She gains no authority or stability no matter how loving or even how necessary she is to a family because there simply is no position in the parental family structure for her.

The managing daughter thus reveals a deep crack in the structure of the traditional Victorian family by showing that it often cannot accommodate, protect, or validate a loving non-traditional family member because it values traditional hierarchies over emotion or effort. Yet, in doing so, it also suggests that if it is position not passion that matters, then as long as a woman assumes the right position in the family then deep emotional connections to others are not necessary for her to care competently for others.

Virginia B. Engholm , The average birth rate per woman in was just over seven, but by , that rate had fallen to just under than three and a half. The question that this dissertation explores is what cultural narratives about reproduction and reproductive control emerge in the wake of this demographic shift. How do women, and society, control birth? This dissertation, then, constructs a cultural narrative of the process of controlling birth.

While the chapters of this work often focus on traditional sites of birth control—contraceptives, abortion, and eugenics—they are not limited to those forms, uncovering previously hidden narratives of reproduction control.

By focusing on a variety of cultural texts—advertisements, fictional novels, historical writings, medical texts, popular print, and film—this project aims to create a sense of how these cultural productions work together to construct narratives about sexuality, reproduction, and reproductive control. Relying heavily on a historicizing of these issues, my project shows how these texts—both fictional and nonfictional—create a rich and valid site from which to explore the development of narratives of sexuality and reproductive practices, as well as how these narratives connect to larger cultural narratives of race, class, and nation.

The interdisciplinary nature of this inquiry highlights the interrelationship between the literary productions of the nineteenth and twentieth century and American cultural history. Amber M. Stamper , Most recently, these Christian evangelists have gone online. As a contribution to scholarship in religious rhetoric and media studies, this dissertation offers evangelistic websites as a case study into the ways persuasion is carried out on the Internet.

Through an analysis of digital texts—including several evangelical home pages, a chat room, discussion forums, and a virtual church—I investigate how conversion is encouraged via web design and virtual community as well as how the Internet medium impacts the theology and rhetorical strategies of web evangelists. The project begins within the historical framework of the multiple financial crises that occurred in the late eighteenth century: seven crises took place between and alone, appearing seemingly out of nowhere and creating a climate of financial meltdown.

But how did the awareness of economic turbulence filter into the creative consciousness? Through an interdisciplinary focus on cultural studies and behavioral economics, the dissertation posits that in spite of their conventional, status quo affirming endings opportunists are punished, lovers are married , novels and plays written between and contemplated models of behavior that were newly opportunistic, echoing the reluctant realization that irrationality had become the norm rather than a rare aberration.

By analyzing concrete narrative strategies used by writers such as Frances Burney, Georgiana Cavendish, Hannah Cowley, and Thomas Holcroft, I demonstrate that late eighteenth-century fiction both articulates and elides the awareness of randomness and uncertainty in its depiction of plot, character, and narrative.

George Micajah Phillips , Eliot, and others sought to better understand how identity was recognized, particularly visually. By exploring how painting, photography, colonial exhibitions, and cinema sought to manage visual representations of identity, these modernists found that recognition began by acknowledging the familiar but also went further to acknowledge what was strange and new as well.

Aparajita Sengupta , Indian cinema is a subject about which conceptions are still muddy, even within prominent academic circles. The majority of the recent critical work on the subject endeavors to correct misconceptions, analyze cinematic norms and lay down the theoretical foundations for Indian cinema. This dissertation conducts a study of the cinema from India with a view to examine the extent to which such cinema represents an anti-colonial vision. The political resistance of Indian films to colonial and neo-colonial norms, and their capacity to formulate a national identity is the primary focus of the current study.

Kenneth Carr Hawley , For Boethius, confused and conflicting views on fame, fortune, happiness, good and evil, fate, free will, necessity, foreknowledge, and providence are only capable of clarity and resolution to the degree that one attains to knowledge of the divine mind and especially to knowledge like that of the divine mind, which alone possesses a perfectly eternal perspective.

Thus, as it draws upon such fundamentally Boethian passages on the eternal Prime Mover, this study demonstrates how the translators have negotiated linguistic, literary, cultural, religious, and political expectations and forces as they have presented their own particular versions of the Boethian vision of eternity.

Even though the text has been understood, accepted, and appropriated in such divergent ways over the centuries, the Boethian vision of eternity has held his Consolations arguments together and undergirded all of its most pivotal positions, without disturbing or compromising the philosophical, secular, academic, or religious approaches to the work, as readers from across the ideological, theological, doctrinal, and political spectra have appreciated and endorsed the nature and the implications of divine eternity.

Drawing on archival materials, fieldwork, and interviews, I map a theory of bounce that connects sixteenth century European court tennis first to nineteenth century British imperial sports played with industrial rubber balls, then to the squash-and-stretch techniques in Disney animation, and finally to the bounce programs that sit under contemporary computer graphics and world modeling practices. I argue that bounce is a property distributed among people and things — a name for those kinds of interactions from which all of the entities involved emerge with their shapes and speeds relatively intact and with their identities confirmed — and that sport and other rule-bound games provide frameworks for these kinds of material symbolic interactions and thus offer method of measuring, situating, and placing the self in the world.

This dissertation examines the novel challenges that data mining poses to privacy, fairness, and autonomy. These findings suggest that practitioners, policymakers, and scholars should attend to the properties of such systems before they adopt big data as objective evidence for their own purposes. The dissertation then delves into the inner workings of the data mining process to better account for its foundational assumptions, its potential sources of bias, and its claims to accuracy.

It demonstrates that the push for improved accuracy may have the perverse result of reifying evaluation methods that cannot capture the full range of bias and error that may beset a data mining project.

It also addresses the fact that improved predictive accuracy often comes at the cost of greater complexity. The dissertation then develops a framework to explain why consumers may perceive certain kinds of inferences as violations of their privacy.

It focuses on a series of real-world cases where the very possibility of making inferences was not apparent and where individuals could not arrive at these conclusions through their own powers of reason. The dissertation argues that where such inferences deny individuals the ability to anticipate the possible import of the behaviors that they exhibit, individuals will perceive data mining as a profound threat to their privacy and autonomy.

Finally, the dissertation explores the paradoxical finding from computer science that attempts to ensure procedural fairness in data mining may be in conflict with the imperative to ensure accurate determinations. It shows that data miners cannot disentangle legitimate and proscribed criteria from their model-building because proscribed attributes meaningfully condition what relevant attributes individuals possess. The dissertation concludes by considering the policy implications of the finding that any decision that only takes these relevant attributes into account would still nevertheless recapitulate inequality.

This study broadly explores urban prostitution. The district represents an intrinsic and authentic part of the city because of its long history and the specific type of prostitution that has developed there—the red light window. But recently public perception has shifted.

The district is increasingly seen as a foreign, crime-ridden area, and a place of sexual exploitation. Shifting focus from legal and ethical issues surrounding the sex industry, but not omitting them, this study looks at the spatial environments of urban sex commerce.

The study uses archival, ethnographic, and discursive analysis research to show how the sex industry organizes itself and self-designs spaces for sex commerce, opening up new terrain through which to understand this complex and contradictory sector. Through a geneaology of De Wallen, it also connects the urban spatialities of sex work to specific moral discourse about prostitution, showing that urban spatial forms of sex commerce are key discursive sites.

Ultimately, the study zeros in on new urban design ideology and practice, demonstrating how they transform and dematerialize sex work in the city, in the process erasing vernacular city spaces like the Red Light District. It problematizes the market model of prostitution and sheds much needed light on the effects of urban design on sex work in the city. Yet, the term proprietary trading is ambiguous, as it can refer to a variety of competing trading activities, financial instruments, and agents operating in the financial field.

The ambiguity arises from the complexity by which financial action and value are mediated in the global capital markets, as well as from a lack of historical context. This dissertation uses the figure of the credit trader to examine the complex history and organization, as well as the technical tools and devices used in the contemporary practice of proprietary trading in the global credit markets, in order to show how an orientation to risk and speculation has emerged as a productive means, or ethos, by which different forms of value are mediated.

Relying upon a deeply social and agentive practice, the day-to-day practice of proprietary trading and the circulation of credit instruments constructs a picture of finance that resembles a ritual form, one that ediates social relationships and value, operating to secure and enclose claims on wealth generated in the market. The attempt to ban such practices emerges not so much as meaningful reform, but rather as redefining the spaces of circulation calling attention to how governance simultaneously invokes and denies different publics.

The practice of proprietary trading and its history reveals much more than how value is produced and disproportionately claimed by financial actors, but demonstrates how the act of risking together can make wealth more expansive. Everyone with a web presence has the potential to live on as information.

Today, numerous stories in the popular press examine the afterlives of social data, asking what happens to our online profiles, feeds, blogs, and accounts after we die? This dissertation traces the rise of digital estate planning, a new cultural field that organizes individuals' various online accounts and bequeaths control of these materials to designated kin members. I locate the origins of digital estate planning in the aftermath of the campus shootings at Virginia Tech in April , when victims' loved ones petitioned Facebook to keep the profiles of those who were killed as virtual, interactive shrines.

Virginia Tech was a particularly networked place, and the Blacksburg Electronic Village already shaped campus life. By connecting the valorization of Facebook pages to a longer history of web memorialization practices that appeared during s net culture, I show how Web 2. Based on qualitative interviews with digital mourners and digital estate planning startup company founders alike, I discuss how Facebook memorialization precipitated the emergence of digital estate planning as a way of capturing what I call communicative traces, or the electronic ephemera people constantly create over a dense ecology of interfaces, platforms, and devices.

In aggregate, communicative traces are speculatively valuable because of their connection to data mining as well as their potential to become meaningful heirlooms transferred across generations. Some digital estate planning websites are tied to transhumanism, a movement that promises immortality by uploading human consciousness into computers, thus connecting mundane actuarial practices to loftier techno-utopian goals.

For surviving kin members, digital remains are complicated by the burdens of caring for them, which requires physical infrastructures, perpetual upkeep, and affective labor. Do we have obligations to digital souls, and what are the ethical, legal, emotional, and material implications of this kind of afterlife? Historically, efforts to grapple with text computationally have played a pivotal yet largely unexamined role in both the technical development and popular imagination of computing, artificial intelligence, and data processing.

Through archival research and original interviews, I map the discursive and material arrangements that brought language under the purview of data processing and the corresponding development of statistical techniques that today underwrite applications across diverse fields, generating financial models, genome sequences, and web search results alike.

The pursuit of text prediction, I argue, prepared the conceptual terrain for predictive analytics as a distinct and pervasive form of knowledge work, where information could be unanchored from the demands of explanation. Centering on two pivotal encounters between statistical modeling and text processing—first in speech recognition research beginning in the s and then in text-mining in the s—this project offers an account of how data processing became a means of not only transmitting, but also generating knowledge.

By drawing out the history of its epistemic underpinnings, this research wrests data-driven analytics from the quarantine of technical inevitability, and highlights the sociotechnical arrangements in which such practices became not only technically feasible, but thinkable and desirable in the first place.

In so doing, it follows the transformation of early forms of logistical media in order to historicize their impact on the development of decentralized manufacture and the arrangement of the productive apparatus over the prior two centuries. This argues for an understanding of logistics as a second-order operation, the optimization and encapsulation of networks already well understood.

To this end, I examine the extent to which emergent mediators—sites like the warehouse, small shop, and factory; documents like the bill of lading, parts list, and catalogue—came to be inscribed within the pattern of production externalized by technologies of telecommunication like the telegraph, telephone, and telex.

In developing these accounts, I consider how these mediators circulated between actors as they engaged in historic debates about the nature of production. By reading media forms like advertisements, pamphlets, and reports not only as functional documents, but as emblems and spokes-things reinforcing particular patterns of association, these forms emerge as the very mechanisms defining emergent practices of manufacture and trade.

They become not only the raw material for new patterns of association, but often the very means through which those associations became durable. By leveraging manufacturing networks into pathways for product distribution, some early twentieth century companies were able to marshal vast numbers of suppliers as sources for other businesses.

For the readers of their supply catalogues or owners of their order books, this promised a singular point of origin for material needs. Through the work of the telecommunication and electrical industries—the companies of the Bell System, electrical manufacturers like Western Electric, and nascent computing concerns like IBM—the language of logistics has, I argue, become ingrained within the mechanisms of modern mediation. This dissertation explores historical and social contexts through which governments employ technology to identify individuals through their bodies.

It poses the question of why these programs are necessary and investigates the promise and limitations of these technologies' influence on policy and the relationships that they mediate. It does this by considering historical and contemporary identification programs: tattooing in the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camps during World War II, mobile fingerprint and iris scanning by the United States military in Iraq and Afghanistan in the 's, and the ongoing implementation of the Unique ID project in India.

Through these case studies, I show how governmental programs that affect people as individuals, i. Further, in situations where the control and surveillance of individuals is at its peak prisons, welfare systems, occupied territories , more stringent and innovate means of identification are deployed.

Specifically, when forced to manage the anxiety of fluid identities, government officials reach for the stability of the material, i. The alluring yet elusive promise of perfect universal identification is one of the most pervasive and interesting characteristics of the policy discourse on modern identification.

It is the disconnect between the promise of an ideal future and the technical failures of the present that allows the flexibility necessary for those tasked with governing to reconcile the messiness of reality with the abstract dictates of bureaucracy, while legitimizing these decisions in routine practice. Yet for those who are subjected to such programs, identification is a mixed blessing. With each identification transaction, there is a possibility that the individual is a fraud. In order to fight the chance of deception, the mechanisms of identification must be opaque to the very populace that they aim to make transparent.

Instead of clarifying and simplifying the relationship between those who have legitimate claims on the state and the agencies set up to help or protect them, identity regimes create technological black boxes whose output is often a matter of life and death.

This dissertation examines the psychic effects of cancer, in particular how cancer disrupts the security with which a body ordinarily feels coincident with the self. Using psychoanalytic theory and literary analysis of atypical pathographies, the study shows how cancer prompts a loss of feelings of unity, exposing the vulnerability of bodily integrity and agency.

The thesis analyzes how three exemplary figures, psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, poet Audre Lorde, and literary theorist Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, grapple with life-threatening illness that is compounded with other violences to their identities, such as racism and homophobia. Cancer's destruction demands from each a creative response that mediates their relationship to morbidity and mortality. Freud's sixteen-year ordeal with a prosthetic jaw, the result of oral cancer, demonstrates the powers and failures of a prosthetic object in warding off physical and psychic fragmentation.

Lorde's life writing reveals how losing a breast to cancer recapitulates the loss of the original "first object," the maternal breast, and the reassurance of wholeness and protection that it promises. Drawing on Lorde's critique of breast prostheses, I interpret the social pressure to reconstruct the absent breast as fetishistic. Sedgwick's memoir and breast cancer advice column function as explicitly reparative projects that seek to come to terms with impending death by disseminating a public discourse of love and pedagogy.

I conclude by interrogating reparative efforts at the rival Freud Museums. In London, where Freud fled to "die in freedom," the analyst's possessions are mobilized to symbolically defy his death, while in Vienna, photographs taken prior to Freud's exile are recruited to compensate for the Museum's material and historical losses.

Affliction has the capacity to uncover knowledge that is typically repressed in quotidian existence, for instance, awareness of death's immanence in life. Psychoanalytic intervention clarifies problems that physical trauma can pose, which cut across the tenuous divide between the conscious and unconscious.

I argue that the habitual threat to life forces the unconscious to become conscious, a process that is disconcertingly destabilizing and itself divisive. However, the prospect of imminent destruction paradoxically incites a creativity that I suggest is a requisite albeit inadequate reparative endeavor. Home work and the Bedroom-Study: Work, Leisure and Communication Technology, investigates the myth of the bedroom as a space of sex and privacy and the disruption of the myth through the introduction of communication technology.

This project examines the bedroom as a site of work, although it is commonly associated with modern notions of what constitutes the private sphere. Privacy has historically been reflected in the separation of home and work, the private and public spheres, respectively. However, as I argue, the bedroom has always been a space where the line between public and private is blurred. Within the home, the bedroom is a key site for this intersection of leisure and work. In examining the bedroom as a social space, this project reveals how representations in popular culture of the bedroom depict persistent and shifting American ideologies about family life, class, gender, and the relationship between work and leisure and potentially challenges them.

Furthermore, this research reveals how the production and design of the hybrid bedroom-study have helped alter and consequently reveal transformations in the meaning of leisure and work life. This research contributes to the interdisciplinary areas of cultural studies, communication and media studies by combining the social history of the bedroom and media studies to understand the influence of long-term social processes on the present and to determine connections between media, space, technological development, and structures of power.

Specifically, this research examines the social organization of space as a site of ideological meaning, where markers of difference such as class and gender are contested, negotiated, and transformed, and the role of communication technologies in those processes. As legacy news outlets slash foreign news budgets, international NGOs have been discussed as sources of both promise and caution with respect to the future of foreign news - for journalists, for advocates and for citizens.

To optimists, NGOs provide original, insightful reporting from neglected areas of the world. To skeptics, the influence of such groups augurs a worrisome conflation of the lines between advocacy and journalism, with deleterious consequences befalling both parties.

This dissertation tests these competing claims by asking what the information work of NGOs is, what types of news coverage they support and whether NGOs expand or reinforce established patterns of international news attention. The dissertation puts forward three primary findings.

First, NGO information work is neither singular nor shaped entirely by the preferences of the news media. Instead, both NGOs and news media are internally differentiated between elite and general public sectors and the international differentiations correspond to different relations across sectors - making interactions between elite-oriented NGOs and the prestige press much more likely than interactions, and vice versa.

Third, the capacity of NGOs to live up to their stated missions of raising awareness of neglected parts of the world depends on where they seek publicity. A group's capacity to bring countries from outside the media spotlight into it is most likely to occur in the prestige press, not the broadcast media.

The dissertation concludes by evaluating the normative implications of the research findings. If one sees the role of public communication as mediating between experts, the data provide room of cautious optimism. NGOs that align with the prestige press constitute a modest expansion of elites and allow for civil society perspectives to be articulated in elite discussions.

If, however, one sees the role of NGOs as raising general public awareness of issues outside the media spotlight, the space for optimism diminishes greatly. This dissertation explores the ways in which the photography of Hurricane Katrina is informed by historical networks of representation and distribution through the strategies of visuality and countervisuality.

Photography and visuality have a unique relationship, both in terms of the importance of both as a commodity, but also in that they both represent ideologies. In the case of post-Katrina photography, what emerged was my inquiry into the experience of the body, specifically the black body, in the circum Atlantic "new world" that was the United States and the unique subject position that the body occupies within the photographic archive.

Image Objects: An Archaeology of 3D Computer Graphics, explores the early history of 3D computer graphics and visualization with a focus on the pioneering research center at the University of Utah. The University of Utah is one of the most significant sites in the history of computing, but has been largely neglected by historians and digital media scholars alike.

From almost all fundamental principals of modern computer graphics were developed by Utah graduates and faculty, many of whom went on to found some of the most important research and technical organizations of the past fifty years, including Adobe, Pixar, Netscape, and Atari. The project begins with this history, but looks to pull apart familiar narratives of invention and innovation by engaging the challenges and failures of early research into computer visualization.

As such the project is organized around a set of technical and cultural objects of particular significance to the early history of graphics. Chapter One introduces the project and its research site and the University of Utah, discussing methods, archives, and the history of the Utah program. Chapter Two offers a meditation on questions of vision and visibility, structured around the development of the "hidden surface algorithm" for graphical display from Chapter Three offers an analysis of memory and materiality through the lens of early graphics hardware, with a focus on the development of the first commercial framebuffer in Chapter Four investigates objects and ontology through an analysis of the "Utah Teapot", a famous graphical object standard developed in and used widely in contemporary software, film, and research demonstrations.

Finally, Chapter Five offers an analysis of language and text through an exploration of the object-oriented paradigm first conceived by Alan Kay at the University of Utah. By looking to the first moments in which visual computing is made possible this project critiques popular narratives that view the digital image as an extension of earlier visual forms, arguing instead that the development of 3D interactive graphics marks the moment at which computer science develops a concern for ontology and the simulation of objects in the world.

Ultimately the project seeks to make the familiar strange, offering a theory of the digital image that refuses a genealogy of the visible. Whereas many studies of the art market have focused on market participants and technologies, this study has taken as its object the ways in which popular portrayals of art market - the understandings they disclose - index the development of the neoliberal "regime of truth.

Surveying board games, reality television, investment manuals, graduate education, and legal battles, the dissertation charts a wide array of attempts to inscribe or prescribe neoliberal rationality - its reducation of the social to competition, of knowledge to action-oriented calculation, and of being to invested human capital - in the art market and, importantly, their failures. In theorizing those failures, the dissertation seeks to illuminate the very limits of neoliberal rationality and its concomitant subject formation and, thus, point toward potential for resistance and advance the rethinking both our governing forms of reason but the subject itself.

This dissertation considers how advances in the surveillance of cell phone data, decentralized mobile networks, and vocal affective monitoring software are changing the ways in which listening exerts power and frames social and political possibilities. The low- and middle-level design limitations and broad implementations of these communication media frame cultural circumstances in terms of what kinds of emotional expressions and social relations are both perceptible and acceptable.

The first chapter looks at recent and contemporary software that seeks to identify emotions in the acoustic voice by ignoring words and instead measuring quantifiable parameters of sound. The design of these algorithms shows a change in their conception of the human emotional system as they evolve from truth-telling to predictive machines. The second chapter traces the development and global dissemination of cell phone surveillance programs.

It concludes that these social movements experimented with autonomous zones of horizontal connectivity, but failed to sustain themselves in part because of a lack of resilient communications infrastructures to mirror and facilitate their politics. The fourth chapter is a whitepaper outlining the requirements elicitation for the amidst project, an ad-hoc peer-to- peer decentralized network for mobile devices, which is a collaboration between the author and three engineers.

This project proposes a remedy to the critiques of surveillance, blocking, and infrastructural weakness elucidated throughout previous chapters. This dissertation explores localism through a variety of lenses. It primarily examines Brooklyn's local, artisanal food movement and the branding of Brooklyn, and also looks at early localist tendencies in the borough as well as the early food movement in California. It positions the localism movement as a cultural response to globalization and the post-industrialism.

This project is not only about food and branding but about how nostalgia for the late nineteenth or early twentieth century becomes the primary form of these post-industrial practices. Once a major port and industrial sector and renown for its village-like ethnic neighborhoods, Brooklyn has responded to an economic imperative and transitioned into a post-industrial economy.

Its population and neighborhoods have dynamically transformed, largely due to immigrants and rising real estate prices. While the borough's economy is no longer based on a producerist model, there has been a ground-swell of efforts to reverse the trend of globalization by creating small-scale, "local" food networks and to "return" to a kind of pre-industrial mode of food production, whether in practice or in aesthetics. In Brooklyn, part of one of the most cosmopolitan cities of the world, the local food movement has emerged in tandem with an ethos and aesthetic of craftwork, in part, as a response to shift from manufacturing and manual labor to a service economy where much work is considered "immaterial.

It traces the rise of conscious locavore practices nationally, internationally, and in Brooklyn. It interrogates the politics of the local food movement, through discourses and practices of localism and of craftwork within the milieu what has been called "New Brooklyn Cuisine," a subgenre of American Cuisine that has a particular century-old, rustic aesthetic.

Finally, this dissertation analyzes Brooklyn's turn to branding and destination marketing to be economically competitive in the global economy, efforts which are equally steeped in nostalgia for a Brooklyn of yore. What is at stake here, in each case, is the question of urban authenticity.

This dissertation is about how mainstream U. These three developments, I argue, were pivotal in re-shaping the public sphere from one where relatively few voices and viewpoints prevailed, to one where a greater diversity of voices and viewpoints are considered legitimate, thereby increasing the instances in which no one narrative becomes widely accepted as "truth;" or, stated differently, decreasing the salience of issues or ideas on which a broad majority of Americans are in agreement.

This dissertation finds that mainstream news, with its mandate of objectivity, has increasingly imposed its own logic on a socio-political world with multiple, often conflicting, voices, while at the same time working to defend against successful challenges to the very institutions on which its own legitimacy rests. As such it highlights the historical contingency of the practice of journalistic objectivity - how it is indelibly marked by its formation in the crucible of the liberal-centrist twentieth century - and shows how "objective" news has adapted to the epistemological challenges posed by a pluralist and partisan political sphere.

Global demand for the planet's best sushi has fueled the environmentalists' concern that the prized bluefin--what industry insiders call "red gold"--is on the brink of extinction. At the same time, nation states have agreed to protect it and other animals on the high seas through the policies adopted by the treaty body known as the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas ICCAT.

Because marine life has plummeted under ICCAT's watch since its inception some four decades ago, this dissertation asks: what is ICCAT achieving, if not its advertised purpose to conserve sea creatures? This ethnographic study illuminates environmental diplomacy in action, and takes the supply of the high-profile Atlantic bluefin tuna as material to explain how the oceans are governed, by whom, for whom and according to what values and logics.

Based on time-series data collected over three years, it shows in situ that ICCAT is entangled in a larger universe of international lawmaking, economic development, statecraft, civil society and fisheries science--all to master very mobile things of nature. The dissertation advances three primary findings. First, red gold and ICCAT co-produced one another, and did so under pressure from the environmentalists and from encroaching international legal instruments.

In the game of marine conservation, delegates worry about the net total of the export quota. Yet in the game of economic development, member states seek to grow their share of the pie. Conservation is calibrated to supplying the market for economic growth, not to creating an ocean full of fish.

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My dissertation addresses the question of how meaning is made when texts and images are united in multimodal arguments. Visual rhetoricians have often attempted to understand text-image arguments by privileging one medium over the other, either using text-based rhetorical principles or developing new image-based theories.

In each of these periods, I argue that dissociation reveals how the privileged medium can shape an entire multimodal argument. I conclude with a discussion of dissociative multimodal pedagogy, applying dissociation to the multimodal composition classroom.

I argue that the space of the specter is a force of representation, an invisible site in which the uncertainties of antebellum economic and social change become visible. Methodologically, Apparitional Economies moves through historical events and textual representation in two ways: chronologically with an attention to archival materials through the antebellum era beginning with the specters that emerge with the Panic of and interpretively across the readings of a literary specter as a space of lack and potential, as exchange, as transformation, and as the presence of absence.

As a failed body and, therefore, a flawed embodiment of economic existence, the literary specter proves a powerful representation of antebellum social and financial uncertainties. Michael Todd Hendricks , Drawing from the history of adolescence and the context of midcentury female juvenile delinquency, I argue that studios and teen girl stars struggled for decades with publicity, censorship, and social expectations regarding the sexual license of teenage girls. Until the late s, exploitation films and B movies exploited teen sex and pregnancy while mainstream Hollywood ignored those issues, struggling to promote teen girl stars by tightly controlling their private lives but depriving fan magazines of the gossip and scandals that normally fueled the machinery of stardom.

This new image was a significant departure from the widespread belief that the sexually active teen girl was a fundamentally delinquent threat to the nuclear family, and offered a liberal counterpoint to more conservative teen girl prototypes like Hayley Mills, which continued to have cultural currency. It explores the literary presence of the middle class managing daughter in the Victorian home.

Collectively, the novels in this study articulate social anxieties about the unclear and unstable role of daughters in the family, the physically and emotionally challenging work they, and all women, do, and the struggle for daughters to find a place in a family hierarchy, which is often structured not by effort or affection, but by proscribed traditional roles, which do not easily adapt to managing daughters, even if they are the ones holding the family together.

The managing daughter is a problem not accounted for in any conventional domestic structure or ideology so there is no role, no clear set of responsibilities and no boundaries that could, and arguably should, define her obligations, offer her opportunities for empowerment, or set necessary limits on the broad cultural mandate she has to comfort and care others.

The extremes she is often pushed to reveals the stresses and hidden conflicts for authority and autonomy inherent in domestic labor without the iconic angel in the house rhetoric that so often masks the difficulties of domestic life for women. She gains no authority or stability no matter how loving or even how necessary she is to a family because there simply is no position in the parental family structure for her.

The managing daughter thus reveals a deep crack in the structure of the traditional Victorian family by showing that it often cannot accommodate, protect, or validate a loving non-traditional family member because it values traditional hierarchies over emotion or effort.

Yet, in doing so, it also suggests that if it is position not passion that matters, then as long as a woman assumes the right position in the family then deep emotional connections to others are not necessary for her to care competently for others. Virginia B. Engholm , The average birth rate per woman in was just over seven, but by , that rate had fallen to just under than three and a half. The question that this dissertation explores is what cultural narratives about reproduction and reproductive control emerge in the wake of this demographic shift.

How do women, and society, control birth? This dissertation, then, constructs a cultural narrative of the process of controlling birth. While the chapters of this work often focus on traditional sites of birth control—contraceptives, abortion, and eugenics—they are not limited to those forms, uncovering previously hidden narratives of reproduction control. By focusing on a variety of cultural texts—advertisements, fictional novels, historical writings, medical texts, popular print, and film—this project aims to create a sense of how these cultural productions work together to construct narratives about sexuality, reproduction, and reproductive control.

Relying heavily on a historicizing of these issues, my project shows how these texts—both fictional and nonfictional—create a rich and valid site from which to explore the development of narratives of sexuality and reproductive practices, as well as how these narratives connect to larger cultural narratives of race, class, and nation. The interdisciplinary nature of this inquiry highlights the interrelationship between the literary productions of the nineteenth and twentieth century and American cultural history.

Amber M. Stamper , Most recently, these Christian evangelists have gone online. As a contribution to scholarship in religious rhetoric and media studies, this dissertation offers evangelistic websites as a case study into the ways persuasion is carried out on the Internet. Through an analysis of digital texts—including several evangelical home pages, a chat room, discussion forums, and a virtual church—I investigate how conversion is encouraged via web design and virtual community as well as how the Internet medium impacts the theology and rhetorical strategies of web evangelists.

The project begins within the historical framework of the multiple financial crises that occurred in the late eighteenth century: seven crises took place between and alone, appearing seemingly out of nowhere and creating a climate of financial meltdown. But how did the awareness of economic turbulence filter into the creative consciousness? Through an interdisciplinary focus on cultural studies and behavioral economics, the dissertation posits that in spite of their conventional, status quo affirming endings opportunists are punished, lovers are married , novels and plays written between and contemplated models of behavior that were newly opportunistic, echoing the reluctant realization that irrationality had become the norm rather than a rare aberration.

In all cases, the abstract is the very last thing you write. It should be a completely independent, self-contained text, not an excerpt copied from your paper or dissertation. The easiest approach to writing an abstract is to imitate the structure of the larger work — think of it as a miniature version of your dissertation or research paper. In most cases, this means the abstract should contain four key elements. See an example.

Start by clearly defining the purpose of your research. What practical or theoretical problem does the research respond to, or what research question did you aim to answer? After identifying the problem, state the objective of your research. Use verbs like investigate , test , analyze or evaluate to describe exactly what you set out to do.

This part of the abstract can be written in the present or past simple tense , but should never refer to the future, as the research is already complete. Next, indicate the research methods that you used to answer your question. This part should be a straightforward description of what you did in one or two sentences. It is usually written in the past simple tense as it refers to completed actions. Next, summarize the main research results.

This part of the abstract can be in the present or past simple tense. Depending on how long and complex your research is, you may not be able to include all results here. Try to highlight only the most important findings that will allow the reader to understand your conclusions.

Finally, state the main conclusions of your research : what is your answer to the problem or question? The reader should finish with a clear understanding of the central point that your research has proved or argued. Conclusions are usually written in the present simple tense. If there are important limitations to your research for example, related to your sample size or methods , you should mention them briefly in the abstract.

This allows the reader to accurately assess the credibility and generalizability of your research. If your aim was to solve a practical problem, the conclusions might include recommendations for implementation. If relevant, you can briefly make suggestions for further research. If your paper will be published, you might have to add a list of keywords at the end of the abstract.

These keywords should reference the most important elements of the research to help potential readers find your paper during their own literature searches. Be aware that some publication manuals, such as APA Style , have specific formatting requirements for these keywords. These strategies can help you get started.

Not all abstracts will contain precisely the same elements. If your research has a different structure for example, a humanities dissertation that builds an argument through thematic chapters , you can write your abstract through a process of reverse outlining. For each chapter or section, list keywords and draft sentences that summarize the central point or argument. Next, revise the sentences to make connections and show how the argument develops.

The abstract should tell a condensed version of the whole story, and it should only include information that can be found in the main text. Reread your abstract to make sure it gives a clear summary of your overall argument. You probably already read lots of journal article abstracts while conducting your literature review —try using them as a framework for structure and style.

You can also find lots of dissertation abstract examples in thesis and dissertation databases. A good abstract is short but impactful, so make sure every word counts. Each sentence should clearly communicate one main point. Avoid unnecessary filler words, and avoid obscure jargon — the abstract should be understandable to readers who are not familiar with your topic.

If you are writing a thesis or dissertation or submitting to a journal, there are often specific formatting requirements for the abstract —make sure to check the guidelines and format your work correctly. Always stick to the word limit. If you have not been given any guidelines on the length of the abstract, write no more than one double-spaced page.

The abstract appears after the title page and acknowledgements and before the table of contents. I have clearly stated my research problem and objectives. I have briefly described my methodology. I have summarized the most important results. I have stated my main conclusions. You've written a great abstract! Use the other checklists to continue improving your thesis or dissertation. An abstract is a concise summary of an academic text such as a journal article or dissertation. It serves two main purposes:.

Abstracts are often indexed along with keywords on academic databases, so they make your work more easily findable. An abstract for a thesis or dissertation is usually around — words. The abstract is the very last thing you write. You should only write it after your research is complete, so that you can accurately summarize the entirety of your thesis or paper.